You can offer them a prize for reading a chapter, read to them before bed until they want a taste of an independent read, and tell them how great reading is. If it's an age thing (ie. your child is eight months old and henceforth, can't even speak full sentences), give them time to adapt to it. Encourage it! Children find role models in parents, teachers, elders, and basically everyone. If you can't spark an interest, appoint someone else to encourage it.
But perception doesn't always jibe with reality, as Carol Hamlin, of New York City, learned. While her older son, Will (now 12), enjoyed combing through the sports section of the paper on his bus ride to kindergarten, his brother, Tim (now 9), was still struggling to read when he entered second grade. "At first, we were concerned that there was something wrong," says Hamlin. "But it turns out that he only needed time and practice. Now he's in a program for gifted children. He's just a kid who has to do things his own way."
I agree this is an awesome price, and in general I admire This Reading Mama a lot! I wish I knew about her curriculum 3 years ago when I taught my daughter to read starting before she was even 3. I used http://progressivephonics.com/. It’s also free, and comes with the same hassle of downloading and printing all the material. It was totally worth it though as Ms Smarty Pants was reading fluently at 3.5. So, yes, I am very much with you – you CAN teach your preschooler to read.
She can do a lot of word building BUT, i think she feels that because it seems difficult to her then she doesn’t particularly enjoy reading…I have to work really hard with her to get her to focus and to actually pick up a book, otherwise I don’t think she would bother..This worries me greatlybecause as we all know if reading is not something you enjoy then life will be more difficult for her than if she enjoyed it.
Nancy Bailey was a teacher in the area of special education for many years, and has a PhD in educational leadership from Florida State University. She has authored two books, Misguided Education Reform: Debating the Impact on Students (Rowman & Littlefield, 2013) and Losing America’s Schools: The Fight to Reclaim Public Education (Rowman & Littlefield,...
These are great for beginner readers. They use simple beginning vocabulary and repetitive text. It's hard to find books that aren't too difficult for my emerging little reader. Many times these particular books are sold with 5 of each book in a set that's meant to be used at school. I was happy to find this set because there's only one of each book - just the number we need! Be aware that they're all black and white inside. At least the cover is in color. My child likes to read books independently and hasn't complained about the lack of color so far.
I absolutely love this book- it's very easy to present and I was amazed how fast my boys (4, 5) were learning to read. However, as others have noted, it can be boring. To me, this is actually a bonus because I want my boys to learn that boring isn't bad and that sitting still is a skill just as much as reading. That being said, I try not to torture them since God created boys to romp around and physical activity makes information stick. We introduced the "hot lava" game for the individual word reading. The ground was hot lava and each sound was written on a safe "rock" (a piece of paper). They walked from rock to rock sounding out the word. When reading the slow way, they step from one sound to the next, if they're not sounding it out, they can't move- that helped with pausing. In the "fast way" they had to put their finger over their mouths while walking or jump from the beginning to the end. They started looking forward to it and after getting some more wiggles out, they were able to sit down to read the story.
Hello ! I have been so interested, now that my children are adults, in the methods of teaching children to learn, while also being concerned about this. They have been so streamlined, and I have to say so limited to books and electronic teaching tools. I could not help but disagree that children should begin reading at about 6 years old. It’s a roadblock to have them wait so long. It is something that I would like to pursue and write a book about why they need not be pushed to learn how to read at a younger age. My children did learn to read at a much earlier age. One of my children, and only one of them is gifted. It had nothing to do with their skills at having so much fun from the time they started crawling with the exception that I simply made my own program for them. They, as babies. had no idea that they were learning to read. It was a game to them. Now that they are adults, they thank me for their success in life. How rewarding as a mom. I also taught them basic math when they were toddlers. All taught with tools from the outdoors. I worked, so many times it was difficult, but sooo worth the effort. I believe that the bonding time and a lot of love is what made it happen. I did read classics to them, but they were not children’s books. There is a way to raise children to love learning and the key is that they don’t even know it. Let me know if you have an interest in pursuing a conversation sometime on how I did it. My baby is now in Med School and will go on to Anesthesiology, so I feel competent to speak from experience at how she arrived, from infancy, to who she is today. Best Wishes, Karen Fega
Have your child practice decoding. Classically known as ‘sounding out’ words, decoding is when a child reads a word by making the sounds of each individual letter, rather than trying to read the whole word at once. Reading is broken up into two primary parts: decoding/reading a word, and comprehending its meaning. Don’t expect your child to recognize and comprehend words just yet; have them focus on decoding and sounding out word parts..
Thanks for a superb guide on teaching one’s child to read. My son loves being read to and is good at comprehending story-lines. He started school four months ago but is not progressing as fast as I’d like with learning to read. He is behind 2/3ds of his peers. Reading all the posts has made me realize what I already know and that is I should just relax about it and not pressurize him. We’ve been playing a word family card game recently and he is enjoying that.

When children classify a book into a certain genre, they have to first summarize the book in their head and recall details.  Then they have to use that information to decide which type of genre that particular books fits into.  Finally, your child will be recalling details from other books in the same genre, making connections between the two.  This simple activity that might take 5-10 seconds of your time after reading a book but it certainly packs a punch of thought and processing in that young brain!
Whether it’s right before bedtime or sometime during the day, make sure there is a time where you focus on reading together. It doesn’t have to be long, twenty minutes a day will still make a huge difference. During these times, take note of what types of stories your child is interested in. If there is a certain theme or author he seems to enjoy, try to find related books that he can start to practice with.
Children enjoy copying words out onto paper. Write your child’s name and have him copy it himself with alphabet stamps, stickers, or magnets. Encourage him to “write” his own words using the letters. Your child will write letters backwards, spell seemingly randomly, and may hold his marker strangely — it’s “all good” at this age when a child wants to communicate in writing of any kind.
When my sons were in middle school, they loved participating in the “Battle of the Books,” a nation-wide program to promote reading. Kids formed teams and read selected books that were high quality and age-appropriate. Then they competed against other teams at their school and other schools, answering questions about the books: characters, plot, symbolism, etc. The team and competition aspect motivated my boys to read, and they had a fun time doing it. I also read a couple of the books aloud to them. Because the books were chosen by a committee of professionals, I enjoyed reading them and discussing the important ideas they covered (immigration, bullying, discrimination) with my sons.

These are bugs which should be fixed. The main one is that when I click on the lessons tab on the website, it only shows up levels one and three (see picture below). The other levels have mysteriously disappeared. This is a pretty annoying bug, and it was consistent across all three of the internet browsers I tried it on. I will be contacting the developer of Reading Head Start about this, so expect it to be fixed soon!!
Help the child sound out words. Once the child can identify the first sound of one syllable words, teach him to add the ending. Use a picture to break up the letters and make each individual sound, then ask the child what the word is. This will help him to understand how each of the sounds created by letters will work together to form words.[6] Have the child practice sounding out the words in the same way.
Upon getting it in the mail, I read the introduction. It picks a few sounds to teach and has kids reading very basic words with the high frequency sounds, adding sounds and words to the mix as it goes along. Brilliant! How I never thought of this on my own is beyond me. On top of that, it's scripted, which makes it so easy. It instructs you exactly what you should do if your kiddo makes a mistake, and how to praise when they get it right.
The kid stays in the picture. In great middle-grade novels, children are the protagonists; they solve problems, have adventures unmediated by adults and are generally the stars of their own shows. That’s why orphans are so common in classic children’s literature. Even in contemporary middle-grade fiction, parents seem to die or be otherwise unavailable at an improbable rate, forcing child characters to bravely confront challenges.

Reading is an important skill for children to learn. Most children learn to read without any major problems. Pushing a child to learn before she is ready can make learning to read frustrating. But reading together and playing games with books make reading fun. Parents need to be involved in their child's learning. Encouraging a child's love of learning will go a long way to ensuring success in school.


Use alphabet flash cards to connect the name of the letter to the printed shape of the letter. Once your child can sing the alphabet song, he or she knows the names of the letters. Go through the cards and tell your youngster the name of each letter and trace it with your finger. Ask your child to repeat the name of the letter and then ask her to name a few words that begin with that letter. Spread the cards on the table or floor and ask her to pick up specific letters.
I know everyone says this, but it really is a good idea — at least with preschoolers. One of my colleagues refers to this advice as the “chicken soup” of reading education. We prescribe it for everything. (Does it help? It couldn’t hurt.) If a parent or caregiver can’t read or can’t read English, there are alternatives, such as using audiobooks; but for those who can, reading a book or story to a child is a great, easy way to advance literacy skills. Research shows benefits for kids as young as 9-months-old, and it could be effective even earlier than that. Reading to kids exposes them to richer vocabulary than they usually hear from the adults who speak to them, and can have positive impacts on their language, intelligence, and later literacy achievement. What should you read to them? There are so many wonderful children’s books. Visit your local library, and you can get an armful of adventure. You can find recommendations from kids at the Children’s Book Council website or at the International Literacy Association Children's Choices site, as well as free books online at other websites like Search Lit or Unite for Literacy.
If your child substitutes one word for another while reading, see if it makes sense. If your child uses the word "dog" instead of "pup," for example, the meaning is the same. Do not stop the reading to correct him. If your child uses a word that makes no sense (such as "road" for "read"), ask him to read the sentence again because you are not sure you understand what has just been read. Recognize your child's energy limits. Stop each session at or before the earliest signs of fatigue or frustration.
If you’re looking for a book that is not your typical alphabet book, this one is for you. The author introduces each letter with an image that starts with that letter surrounded by a black frame. When you lift the frame, the image transforms into the letter. While no more complex than any other alphabet book, this one’s illustrations and interactive nature will surely delight your child.
In addition, this video claims that this reading program will “reverse or even cure Dyslexia,” which is not only completely false but is insulting and offensive. Dyslexia is a lifelong condition that affects the way a person’s brain interprets the information it sees, and children are born with this condition and have it their whole lives. To insinuate that Dyslexia is a condition that parents give their children because they didn’t teach them to read using a specific method is not only a lie, to say it is hurtful and unethical and would never be a claim made by a well-educated teacher. 
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