All in all, we feel that Reading Head Start has completely changed our destiny as parents. We’re writing this review because there’s simply no better way for parents to educate THEMSELVES on how to educate their child. Nothing is as important, and there’s unfortunately very little information out there about how to take advantage of proven learning techniques based on extensive research that even schoolteachers don’t know about. This stuff shouldn’t be a secret. You just have to try it to know how powerful it is.
If you find a reading curriculum that demands that you do every activity in order… that’s a big warning sign.  Are the lessons scripted? Run the other way!  What those curriculum developers don’t understand is that every child is different.  Parents and classroom teachers know their children best.  In Reading the Alphabet, Becky encourages you to pick and choose the activities that interest and meet the needs of your child.
Parents have 3 mantras to remember when teaching their children how to read: 1) Start with the heart. 2) When you're out and about, sound it out and 3) Comprehension is the key that turns sounding out into reading. By keeping these in mind, parents have what they need to turn children into proficient readers who love books and will turn to them for both pleasure and knowledge.
I am responding to this post as part of a college assignment to write an essay either agreeing or disagreeing with someone else’s article. Of course I agree with this one!!! 🙂 I am trying to be sure to list my references according to detailed APA guidelines. There are specific ways to cite my references, depending on where I am getting them from. I briefly mention Chontelle Bonfiglio’s article and quote her on one line in my essay, and I need to know how to give proper credit. Is this website considered a blog, an online forum, a searchable database, or an internet journal? I hope to hear from you soon, because my first draft of my essay is due Wednesday night. Thanks!
One great way to introduce kids to literacy is to take their dictation. Have them recount an experience or make up a story. We’re not talking “Moby Dick” here. A typical first story may be something like, “I like fish. I like my sister. I like grandpa.” Write it as it is being told, and then read it aloud. Point at the words when you read them, or point at them when your child is trying to read the story. Over time, with lots of rereading, don’t be surprised if your child starts to recognize words such as “I” or “like.” (As children learn some of the words, you can write them on cards and keep them in a “word bank” for your child, using them to review later.)
These are great for beginner readers. They use simple beginning vocabulary and repetitive text. It's hard to find books that aren't too difficult for my emerging little reader. Many times these particular books are sold with 5 of each book in a set that's meant to be used at school. I was happy to find this set because there's only one of each book - just the number we need! Be aware that they're all black and white inside. At least the cover is in color. My child likes to read books independently and hasn't complained about the lack of color so far.

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Get a library card. Take the child on regular visits to your local library. Go to the children's section and let the child pick the book he wants to read. Once a week on a set date (Friday after school for example) is also a good way to get into a structured routine. It's alright if he is a bit too old for the book or has already read it. When he is a bit older, let him check out the book at the front desk, but always under your supervision.
I really take a huge advantage of it, while I can. thanks guys, I really love to teach, well I’m not a former at all, but in my native language (Spanish) I do it. I encourage my little child to learn things about life, she is 2 years old, and she knows almost how to speak Spanish very well, I play the piano for her, I read books about kids stuff to her, and so she will become a lover of knowledge just as her father does.
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