Make reading rewarding by asking for your child’s ideas and opinions about his books. You can even help your child create a video “book talk” about a favorite book. Just turn on the camera, and ask him to say the title and author and to describe the story. Then, ask him to explain what he did and didn’t like about the book. When he doesn’t know what to say, ask him a question like, “What was your favorite part?” or “What could the characters do if the story kept going?” Grandparents, aunts, and uncles will treasure this video keepsake.

Avoid using flashcards. Some companies have advertised specialized flashcards to help babies, toddlers, and preschool age children to read. In general, flashcards are not the most useful or effective technique for teaching reading skills. Time spent reading stories with your child will be much more beneficial than flashcards. “Reading aloud to young children, particularly in an engaging manner, promotes emergent literacy and language development and supports the relationship between child and parent. In addition it can promote a love for reading which is even more important than improving specific literacy skills.”[3]
Some of the kids with a keen sense of phonemic awareness are already moving on to what is called in teacher-speak “decodable text” — little books with single lines of text made up of words that can be sounded out with ease. After about thirty minutes, all the children stop their work and, using a broad hand motion for each sound, sing what is known as “the vowel song” with great gusto. When the chorus of cheerful voices begins to die away, North and Matuskiewicz look pleased. “The rap against phonics is that there is too much drilling,” says North. “But look at this classroom. No one is suffering here.”
Thanks for these ideas! I’ve got a (just turned) 2 year old, and he loves his letters. And he loves when I read to him. I feel like he might love learning basic words (which letters form the words he already likes to say), and then he would REALLY love reading. Most of these ideas are advanced for him, but I gives me some ideas for moving forward. Thanks!
Set a positive example by reading books. If a child notices that you are enjoying a book, he will be more likely to develop an interest in reading as well. Try to read around them for about 20 minutes each day. If the child gets curious about what you're doing you can tell him about the book you are reading, or take the opportunity to ask if the child would like to find a book to read.

3. Language rank which in turn encouraged the woman's to do this. The girl needed the girl youngsters and also 1000s of additional young children for the greatest probable begin in lifestyle. Reading is the central skill and that's why Sarah created this kind of scientifically verified system. What Reading Head Start Is really This is an e book that may help you enhance your child's reading through capacity. The novel is actually saved in the label's official website directly into virtually any electronic digital device say for example a computer or cell phone. In your device it's going to appear in the Pdf formatting. The policies contained in the program are distinctive and can't be located in the critiques involving other programs. The training procedure can be divided in to 4 levels regarding simplicity. Being a parent you are required to allocate A quarter hour of your energy to adopt your child through the understanding stages. At the conclusion of every single cycle your child is disseminated a certificate associated with achievement that reinforces the infant's self esteem along with morale.

These are great for beginner readers. They use simple beginning vocabulary and repetitive text. It's hard to find books that aren't too difficult for my emerging little reader. Many times these particular books are sold with 5 of each book in a set that's meant to be used at school. I was happy to find this set because there's only one of each book - just the number we need! Be aware that they're all black and white inside. At least the cover is in color. My child likes to read books independently and hasn't complained about the lack of color so far.
My tip is to incorporate learning into play instead of trying to get him to sit at the table. If you are teaching letter sounds, for example, make a game out of it. Write them on the driveway and have him jump to them. Write the letters on paper plates, tape them to the wall, and have him throw a ball on the letter you call, etc. If he is learning to read, put the letters on connecting blocks and show him how when you connect the blocks you can make a word. You can easily take math outdoors in a variety of ways, and there are many ways to make math activities fun without using worksheets.
Another thing I think is important to remember is to not get frustrated. When it comes to reading, things that seem “obvious” to you aren’t obvious at all to someone who’s learning to read, but when you forget that it can be easy to get frustrated because your child isn’t understanding that seems so obvious to you. Go into it knowing that you’re going to need to be patient! It will definitely give you a new level of appreciation for people who teach children as their profession.

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Make reading a group activity. Just as younger children parallel play, older children parallel read. And reading together — separately — is a wonderful way to spend time in each other’s company. Try it: Instead of organizing family leisure time around TV, movies or video games, schedule a regular family reading time. As your children begin to choose their own books and read independently, they may be less inclined to talk to you about what they’re reading. But if they are reading right next to you, you’ll hear them laugh, exclaim or give some other response, which gives you an opening to conversation.
The Reading Head Start Program is offering their new customers a trial period, where they can get full access to their program for three days for just $1.00. Customers who love this program should do nothing, and at the end of three days they will automatically be charged $37.00 for continued use of this program. This $37.00 charge will continue each and every month until they day you cancel.     
Reading books aloud is one of the best ways you can help your child learn to read. This can be fun for you, too. The more excitement you show when you read a book, the more your child will enjoy it. The most important thing to remember is to let your child set her own pace and have fun at whatever she is doing. Do the following when reading to your child:
If you have concerns about your child's reading level at any time, talk to your child's teacher, school counselor, and doctor. Kids who are not making good reading progress might have a reading disability, such as dyslexia. With the right educational help, most kids can become readers, but identifying the problem and addressing it early will bring about the best results.
I totally agree that reading to your baby is one of the most beneficial things you can do for your child. However, I do think that it is an amazing blessing if your child can read before the standard age of 6. If they know how to read, they can get lost in the magical pages of books – developing a love for reading very early on. Did you ever use any DVDs with young children to help them learn to read? I have used several programs with my children – although my favorite is MonkiSee – and have gleaned many wonderful results. Do you support educational DVDs for teaching babies to read? Have you ever used any?
When my sons were in middle school, they loved participating in the “Battle of the Books,” a nation-wide program to promote reading. Kids formed teams and read selected books that were high quality and age-appropriate. Then they competed against other teams at their school and other schools, answering questions about the books: characters, plot, symbolism, etc. The team and competition aspect motivated my boys to read, and they had a fun time doing it. I also read a couple of the books aloud to them. Because the books were chosen by a committee of professionals, I enjoyed reading them and discussing the important ideas they covered (immigration, bullying, discrimination) with my sons.
The key to increasing your child’s reading volume is motivation. Choose books that match your child’s interest. Or, explore reading with other media your child loves. Is she a fan of princesses? There is a world of online fairy tales for her to explore. Kids who love superheroes can enjoy easy-reader comic books. Don’t be too picky about what your child reads at this age. Captain Underpants may be more meaningful than Little House on the Prairie — and that’s fine!

My son Jake ABSOLUTELY LOVES Reading Head Start!!! I’ve tried a few reading programs in the past and he’s quickly lost interest in all of them. Reading Head Start has been so fantastic because you guys are always adding new content to engage him. He’s constantly asking to log on and see what’s new. Whats made all the difference is that you actually have made this as much about parents as you have the kids. You’ve shown me how to best teach my child and that’s empowering to say the least! Now I REALLY CANT WAIT to send him off to school and get back that first report card! This has been a blessing for our family.” *Disclaimer: Individual results may vary. – Jill K.


From 24 – 36 months, your child needs to consolidate the basic learning that began in the previous year. She may be able to recite the alphabet, count to 10 and identify colors, shapes, animals and parts of the body. Popular favorites for this age group, for example, include Hand, Hand, Fingers, Thumb or The Nose Book and The Ear Book by Al Perkins.
Start to make word-sound associations. Before you even start getting into the alphabet and sound specifics, help your child recognize that the lines on the page are directly correlated to the words you are speaking. As you read aloud to them, point to each word on the page at the same time you say it. This will help your child grasp the pattern of words/lines on the page relating to the words you speak in terms of length and sound.

3. Language rank which in turn encouraged the woman's to do this. The girl needed the girl youngsters and also 1000s of additional young children for the greatest probable begin in lifestyle. Reading is the central skill and that's why Sarah created this kind of scientifically verified system. What Reading Head Start Is really This is an e book that may help you enhance your child's reading through capacity. The novel is actually saved in the label's official website directly into virtually any electronic digital device say for example a computer or cell phone. In your device it's going to appear in the Pdf formatting. The policies contained in the program are distinctive and can't be located in the critiques involving other programs. The training procedure can be divided in to 4 levels regarding simplicity. Being a parent you are required to allocate A quarter hour of your energy to adopt your child through the understanding stages. At the conclusion of every single cycle your child is disseminated a certificate associated with achievement that reinforces the infant's self esteem along with morale.

Thank you for the information and to everyone else with their questions/replies. I am a single parent who has just recently started reading heavily with my 5 year old. He is aware of the sounds and has a few of the basic words down, but struggles with reading. This really makes me frustrated, but after reading this post/comments I am glad to know that what I am forcing him to do is way ahead of his time. Pushing him to read every night and being angry when he doesn’t remember might hinder him from future learning and I definitely do not want to do that. He truly enjoys the last part of the night where we open the books together and I want that feeling to last forever. I greatly appreciate the advice and will completely back off of my son as he still has time to grow into reading whole stories. Due to a late birthday he is currently in Pre-K so I think the pressure of wanting him to do well in school, being a single parent, and my own childhood misfortunes are having a negative impact on me. I plan to regroup for tomorrow nights reading and take things a lot slower with him and make sure that he knows that he is doing a great job. Thank you so much for you have saved me from me in a way.
Hi! I have a 5 and 4 month old daughter who is really interested in learning to read. She won’t start kindergarten until the fall as we are in CA. I love these steps and they help A LOT. I’m wondering if anyone can chime in with how much to put into this now and over the summer before she starts kinder. She seems ready. Would I look into a program like Pathways to Reading? Or just keep it simple and focus on basics? What about ABC mouse? She knows all her letters and most of the sounds (though she sometimes forgets) and seems to enjoy sounding out words together, but maybe only 2 or 3 before she gets bored. I’m in no rush, but she seems ready.
A lot of people don't realise just how many skills can be picked up through the simple act of reading to a child. Not only are you showing them how to sound out words, you're also building key comprehension skills, growing their vocabulary, and letting them hear what a fluent reader sounds like. Most of all, regular reading helps your child to develop a love reading, which is the best way to set them up for reading success.
The program provides instant online access to all of the materials on the computer, smartphone, and tablet for ultimate flexibility. Additionally, Sarah Shephard is offering two additional bonuses for a limited time, including the Reading Shortcuts book along with the Fun with Words book series that is included for free, a combined value of more than $500.
Dear Anna, thank you so much for always sharing amazing works with us, you can’t believe if I tell you I spend much time reading your notes and ideas every day, today I was reading it and suddenly found out that I am on net for about 4 hours, wow your job is amazing, I really love teaching and great ideas and fun which you show us make reading very interesting, God bless you and your family, I wish all your dreams come true, amen. My lil kids will pray for you because you make them happy I will tell them about you all the time.
Once you’ve seen science-based reading instruction delivered well, you’ll want it for your kids. For six years, Kristina Matuskiewicz, a kindergarten teacher at Edna C. Stevens Elementary School in Cromwell, CT, believed that, like all the teachers at her tidy suburban school, she was helping to make good readers. She read them stories, she identified words and described their meaning, she offered them a variety of good books and worked to shift them to independent reading. “Each teacher had their own approach to teaching reading,” says Matuskiewicz.

3. Language rank which in turn encouraged the woman's to do this. The girl needed the girl youngsters and also 1000s of additional young children for the greatest probable begin in lifestyle. Reading is the central skill and that's why Sarah created this kind of scientifically verified system. What Reading Head Start Is really This is an e book that may help you enhance your child's reading through capacity. The novel is actually saved in the label's official website directly into virtually any electronic digital device say for example a computer or cell phone. In your device it's going to appear in the Pdf formatting. The policies contained in the program are distinctive and can't be located in the critiques involving other programs. The training procedure can be divided in to 4 levels regarding simplicity. Being a parent you are required to allocate A quarter hour of your energy to adopt your child through the understanding stages. At the conclusion of every single cycle your child is disseminated a certificate associated with achievement that reinforces the infant's self esteem along with morale.


Hi. As you will see once reading my post, I’m feeling awfully desperate & unable to sleep over issues my kindergartner is having in school. He’s an “older” kindergartner (6.5 y.o.). I have done all the things in your list. He loves me to read to him, and I do often up to an hour 1 day (books of HIS choice). Once he joined kindergarten, I started hearing that the work is too hard, that he hates reading, he can’t read, won’t be able to for a long time, he’s a terrible reader, etc. Early on…probably 3 weeks into the year, they had a 20 sight words screening/test & then placed all the students in reading groups. He seemed upset by the requirements. We were told for homework, to have him scan his finger across the sentences of these black & white scholastic books…example, “I like pizza, I like corn, I like apples, What do you like?” He would get so upset and clearly extremely frustrated by being asked to do this process. The teacher was willing to remove him from the reading groups which seemed to reduce his anxiety some. The class, together, recites out loud the 20+/month sight words they are expected to learn via smartboard. He knows none of them. From my vantage point, this seems to be difficult for him. The teacher says he’s doing “great”. He still occasionally says negative things about his reading ability / confidence. This concerns me greatly & shared this w/ teacher. When the other kids rotate b/w free play time & their reading groups, he’s allowed to do free play but he spends alot of that time @ the computer car games (school considers apart of the free play curriculum). It’s now January & now they will begin journal writing & small sentence writing. I’m certain this will be something he finds frustrating. On one hand, I’m trying to determine whether it’s healthy for him to continue being in this environment or not. Have you ever seen kids move from 1 environment to another mid-year & do well? I’m considering just pulling him out to homeschool w/ more tactile, multisensory methods of learning for the remainder of the year but just not sure what is best. There is more pencil/paper/worksheets as compared tactile, multi-sensory methods of instruction and that is not how he learns best. He often says the paperwork is “too hard”. Last week he said he was scared to go bc of this. I’m very concerned about his confidence; wondering what the environmental impact is of him not being there is )ex:(a number of them are reading accelerated readers). The teacher feels he does not notice this but I don’t get this sense about how he sees himself. He’s very intuitive. I’m not sure what to do but just want to do what is best for my child. For many months now, since October, I have been observing other schools classrooms, visiting them. Most expect these kids to read by spring. And most seem to be. Mine does not though I have done all the things you have posted. Given all that I have said, do you have any recommendations? I believe in respecting where kids are developmentally & it seems to me he simply is not in a place to perform at this level though the teacher seems to think he is doing great.
When children flow right through easy readers, they may start to talk about chapter books. If not, introduce the idea yourself — they’re probably ready, or will be soon. It’s an exciting moment! Something about the feat of working through a bunch of chapters makes a young elementary school student feel gloriously grown up. Early chapter books are mostly published in series, because new readers who finish a book frequently want more time with the characters.
Why should it not be done? Unless it is stressing the child out or forcing him I do not see why it “SHOULDN’T” be done. That is a nice analogy but I don’t see how it is a valid one. Just because a child I advanced or allowed to be ahead of the game does not mean they are not being allowed to be a child. Maybe he is gifted maybe not perhaps he is interested in learning. Children love to learn so yes I agree Let him be a child.
A yearly membership is currently $197.00 USD made with a single one time payment. You then have access for a full 12 months to get the most benefits from the program. Sarah claims that this is the best deal for families who want to take full advantage for the benefits of the program, or for families that have older children that will be using the program – say 8 or 9 years of age
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Fun. Adventure. Playfulness. These are the books that invite your children into the world of readers, where they will spend the rest of their lives. That’s a leap filled with prestige and accomplishment. But if your child feels constantly judged, or that too much attention is paid to the pace of progress, the experience may not be fun. It may even get in the way of learning. You can help by making sure your child has early readers that surprise and delight. Dr. Seuss revolutionized this category and set the standard that still holds, so keep in mind the outrageous fun of Dr. Seuss when you select these books. No matter the topic or story, an early reader book should make reading seem like a club your child wants to be a part of — not a lesson to be graded on.

I’m also a former teacher – and reading at infancy is the key! I began reading to my granddaughter when she was 2 months old. By 1 year, she knew the correct way to hold a book and turn the pages front to back. At 2 years 6 months – she began reading! She is now 2 years 11 months and reading at the 2nd grade level – I’ve tested her! She reads at least 10 books a day.
Reading Mastery is very systematic. It starts by teaching word sounds and what the corresponding letters and words look like. Next, kids learn to read passages. Then they build vocabulary while increasing their understanding of what they read. Students are grouped by reading level. Reading Mastery is often used by general and special education teachers as a complement to other programs. It may also be used on its own. Teachers tend to use one of two versions. Reading Mastery Classic is for grades K–3 and Reading Mastery Plus is taught in grades K–6.
It is at this stage that differences between your child and other children start becoming apparent, inside and outside the school environment. Teachers may have to plan special enrichment activities to meet your child's educational needs, while other children are being taught the basics of reading instruction. This is a positive indication that your child's early reading abilities are in fact the key to academic progress. Your child will already be ahead of her peers, from an academic point of view.
I am fully confident she will learn to read when she learns to read, but as a parent, I sometimes wonder if I should be trying to speed up the process. I’ve followed the advice of friends and purchased BOB Books for beginning readers, and I often prompt her to sound words out. I can tell that she almost gets it, but I can also tell that I’m not much help. So when Daniel T. Willingham, a professor of psychology at the University of Virginia and the author of Raising Kids Who Read, told me that parents don’t need to worry about teaching young kids the mechanics of reading—and in fact, he warns against doing so—I felt free.
In addition, this video claims that this reading program will “reverse or even cure Dyslexia,” which is not only completely false but is insulting and offensive. Dyslexia is a lifelong condition that affects the way a person’s brain interprets the information it sees, and children are born with this condition and have it their whole lives. To insinuate that Dyslexia is a condition that parents give their children because they didn’t teach them to read using a specific method is not only a lie, to say it is hurtful and unethical and would never be a claim made by a well-educated teacher. 
The recommended age range for a middle-grade novel is not usually apparent on the book itself. You can find it on a publisher’s site (sometimes!) or in a reputable review, but keep in mind that your child may — or may not — be ready for a book with some content that skews older. If your child brings home a book you object to, you will have to decide where you stand on censoring your child’s reading choices. But keep in mind that with books — as opposed to movies or TV shows — children can easily tune out or skip over material they’re not emotionally ready for.
As you know I am a new teacher from Iran with no experience and love teaching kids so much, I have 3 ESL kids, they are 5-8 years old, after only 5 months now they know their ABC’s. they know the letter and the sounds I am so proud of them, they learn very fast and also learn the vocabulary very fast, when I show them letter “Aa” they loudly say ‘a, a, a is for apple, alligator, ambulance, ant’ wow and the same for the other letters. But now we have a 2 weeks holiday and in about a week will start new course, but do not know what I should teach them, we do two ESL for kids curriculums but its more about talking and listening and learning new vocabularies but I want to teach them phonics and also their parents want. Now they know their alphabet what would be the next step. I have made a phonic book with this order for them,
You will see results your very first day using Reading Head Start! You get to see first hand and for the first time, your child’s mind expanding and understanding letters and the sounds they make! After one week into the system, you’ll notice that what you’re teaching your child is starting to “stick” and from there, you watch as they quickly start to progress forward with amazing results!
Great list, and wonderful summary. I particularly love the emphasis on making it fun and creative and incorporated into different aspects of life. I used a very similar list when documenting my experiences teaching my kids to read at howitaughtmykidstoread.wordpress.com. I’ll definitely be using your post in a future post of my own, and hope you will take a look at my site and let me know what you think. Thanks!
My child hated reading and used to fight me when it was time to do her reading assignments. I’m ashamed to say it took me awhile to realize she wasn’t being disobedient—she was frustrated by the fact she was struggling to read and simply too young to express it. I researched online and found Reading Head Start. I’m always skeptical about things on the internet, but I was at my wit’s end at not knowing how to help my child. I’m glad I took a chance. The program worked for us!
But perhaps the most important reason to read aloud is that it makes a connection between the things your baby loves the most — your voice and closeness to you — and books. Spending time reading to your baby shows that reading is a skill worth learning. And, if infants and children are read to often with joy, excitement, and closeness, they begin to associate books with happiness — and budding readers are created.

Use alphabet flash cards to connect the name of the letter to the printed shape of the letter. Once your child can sing the alphabet song, he or she knows the names of the letters. Go through the cards and tell your youngster the name of each letter and trace it with your finger. Ask your child to repeat the name of the letter and then ask her to name a few words that begin with that letter. Spread the cards on the table or floor and ask her to pick up specific letters.
Beyond the “reading log” mentality. Many students have to keep “reading logs” from elementary school through middle school, a well-meaning, but somewhat controversial practice that risks turning reading into a chore. If your child must keep one, consider the fine irony in bugging your student to crack a book every night, if you rarely do it yourself. Seeing you choose to read can help with your child’s approach to mandated reading time.

These are great for beginner readers. They use simple beginning vocabulary and repetitive text. It's hard to find books that aren't too difficult for my emerging little reader. Many times these particular books are sold with 5 of each book in a set that's meant to be used at school. I was happy to find this set because there's only one of each book - just the number we need! Be aware that they're all black and white inside. At least the cover is in color. My child likes to read books independently and hasn't complained about the lack of color so far.
Hi TripleAMom! I am a big advocate of preschool reading and I have looked at Starfall myself. However, personally I found that it didn’t work that well as most kids I deal with are visual learners. For this reason I developed my own system “Teach Your Child To Read & Reading with Phonics” and have had some incredible results, both with my own child and with many others. Many kids are visual learners, including children with disabilities such as dyslexia and autism, and phonics reading doesn’t work that well for them.
When choosing books to read to your baby, make sure that the texts are simple, and the sentences not too complicated.  Rhymes work best since at this stage, you are reading for ear appeal, rather than comprehension.  Rhymes are a type of sound that the young brain craves.  One word per page books are good too since these books help in starting to build your baby’s spoken vocabulary.
By taking pictures of readers’ brains as the students were reading, researchers observed which parts of the brain were active during the reading process. The researchers also saw that the active areas of the brain differed slightly for poor readers and for good readers. After using an intervention to help poor readers become better readers and overcome reading difficulties, the brain activity patterns of the poor readers during reading changed to look more like those who did not have reading problems. For more on this finding, visit http://www.nichd.nih.gov/news/releases/Pages/brain_function.aspx.
You seem very passionate about reading and I think that’s great. However, you seem very defensive about the method. Quite frankly my only goal is to help children learn to read and I have found that starting with sight reading is the easiest and best method. You, of course are entitled to your opinion as is Mrs Freeman. My son is now turning 10 and he is reading and memorizing Shakespeare (having learned to read from – YES – “call words”!). You are welcome to go to my website and see him doing it if you doubt it. And BTW, my son is 100% homeschooled and he too remains above grade level.
Once your baby begins to grab, you can read vinyl or cloth books that have faces, bright colors, and shapes. When your baby begins to respond to what's inside of books, add board books with pictures of babies or familiar objects like toys. When your child begins to do things like sit up in the bathtub or eat finger foods, find simple stories about daily routines like bedtime or bathtime. When your child starts talking, choose books that invite babies to repeat simple words or phrases.
Early reader books use a limited number of words and are heavily illustrated. Most have a more workmanlike appearance than picture books. They often have no jacket and are slightly taller and narrower. Many are branded with names like “I Can Read” or “Step Into Reading,” and three or sometimes four levels. These are called “Leveled Readers” — you can always spot one because it will have a giant number or letter on the cover identifying its level. Your child is likely to encounter these in school, starting in kindergarten. For that reason, many parents shy away from bringing branded “leveled reader” books home, but there are plenty of early reader books that don’t create the pressured atmosphere those numbers can convey.
DiStefano says that the new program has made her relationship with parents more straightforward. “Before, we might say, ‘That child isn’t reading!’ And we’d shrug. We didn’t know what to do. Now we can sit with a parent and say, ‘Your child is struggling to understand the rule that when a word ends with e, the middle vowel says its own name.’ And we can describe our plan to reteach that and get parents to emphasize that at home and get that child back on the path to reading success.”
When clicking on week one, for instance, there will be five lessons in total. This is the same design throughout weeks 2-40. When completing each lesson, children complete exercises and activities. This makes the learning experience more fun — and more rewarding! The results can truly be life-changing, supporting a child’s skill set throughout their school years.
She can do a lot of word building BUT, i think she feels that because it seems difficult to her then she doesn’t particularly enjoy reading…I have to work really hard with her to get her to focus and to actually pick up a book, otherwise I don’t think she would bother..This worries me greatlybecause as we all know if reading is not something you enjoy then life will be more difficult for her than if she enjoyed it.
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