As your child begins elementary school, she will begin her formal reading education. There are many ways to teach children to read. One way emphasizes word recognition and teaches children to understand a whole word's meaning by how it is used. Learning which sounds the letters represent—phonics—is another way children learn to read. Phonics is used to help "decode" or sound out words. Focusing on the connections between the spoken and written word is another technique. Most teachers use a combination of methods to teach children how to read.
The recommended age range for a middle-grade novel is not usually apparent on the book itself. You can find it on a publisher’s site (sometimes!) or in a reputable review, but keep in mind that your child may — or may not — be ready for a book with some content that skews older. If your child brings home a book you object to, you will have to decide where you stand on censoring your child’s reading choices. But keep in mind that with books — as opposed to movies or TV shows — children can easily tune out or skip over material they’re not emotionally ready for.
Because reading habits are important to instill at an early age, reading activities were created to help guide children through this learning process. These activities encourage quick learning and expand horizons as children read about new things. Online reading activities are learning tools for kids of all ages. They help them develop skills such as spelling, vocabulary, reading and even grammar. This improves communication skills, which in turn, builds confidence in kids.

Michaels further reports, “Sarah Shepard is so confident that her program can help any child that she offers an iron-clad 365 money-back guarantee. If parents aren’t totally happy with how the program has taught their children to read—like it has with nearly 40,000 other children, they can simply request a full refund within 365 days of their purchase, and even keep the free bonuses. There’s virtually no risk in at least trying this program to see how effective it can be for children, even if parents think they have tried everything else possible to help their child to read.”


when they reach letter “n” they can make and read lots of words, like ” sit, sat, pin, pan, ant, is, it, nap, tap” but I told you I am new with no experience and I myself made this phonic book for them, it maybe has lots of errors, but now when I see your pages it was so fun and amazing, but the order is not the same, what should I do, would you please advise me, I have one week to start the next course so I can change my workbook please please show me the best way. God bless you lovely teacher.
In general, a major part of teaching a child to read is to also develop a love of reading alongside. This will give the child a natural motivation to read their favourite books, making the task of teaching reading to them a lot easier! These readers will likely not develop that, so I would recommend that you read to your child on a daily basis outside of this program. Buy your child a bank of excellent children's books that they will grow to love.
First of all, I would recommend concentrating on making reading fun and enjoyable for both of you. He has plenty of time to get the mechanics, but will be turned off to reading altogether if reading becomes something he is forced to do and doesn’t have any confidence. Spend more time reading with him than having him read to you…model proper inflection and fluency. Read engaging stories together. I would also start to work on sight words and word families. Don’t stress. He will get it! :)
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Always follow up a story with a discussion or activity. Studies show that comprehension increases greatly when reading is followed up by discussing the book or doing an activity. Parents might ask: “What was your favorite part?” or “Who was your favorite character and why?” They might ask their child to draw a picture of an alternate ending or help them write a story with a similar plot or theme.
As a former first grade teacher, teaching children to read is one of my greatest passions!  But because most children don’t start actually “reading” until around 6 years old (which is upwards of the targeted age range for my blog), I didn’t want parents to feel pressured that their 3-year old needs to start reading (which, by the way, they don’t!). However, the information shared below is general information that is beneficial for children of all ages, whether your child is ready to read or not. Don’t implement all of these strategies at once, nor should you expect your child to be able to do everything right away.  Learning to read is a process and the information below is simply for you to implement when you feel your child is ready.  
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