Parents and teachers are often overly impressed with children who have decoding skills, incorrectly labeling them as “readers.” But, of course, reading involves much more than merely sounding out words on a page; it also includes comprehension, which is more complex and harder to teach. To comprehend successfully, children must not only have solid decoding skills, they must read fluently and find meaning in the printed text. Once again, when it comes to teaching comprehension, parents are best suited to the task.


To put it simply, word families are words that rhyme.  Teaching children word families is a phonemic awareness activity that helps children see patterns in reading.  This is an important skill because it allows children to begin “reading” by grouping sets of letters within a word.  The first part of a word is called the onset and the last part of the word is conveniently called the rime.  Word families share a similar “rime” as the onset changes.
Her video tells the story of her Kindergarten aged child receiving his very first grade report, and how shocked she was that he was “failing English” and how embarrassing that was for an English teacher. Except Kindergartners don’t have an “English” grade, not now or ever. Parents are simply told whether or not their child is struggling or achieving in a variety of skills based areas. 
Even if your child is one of the lucky ones and is doing fine in reading, students who are poorly served by their primary schools end up being a drain on the public education system. Reading problems are the overwhelming reason why students are identified as having learning disabilities and assigned to special education, often an instructional ghetto of the worst kind.
Don’t forget nonfiction. Some reluctant readers are fact-gatherers, who may be more inspired by reading nonfiction. If it’s presented in a highly visual format, all the better for conveying even more kinds of information. Look for books about presidents, states, ancient history, the solar system, animals, natural disasters, and other topics they’re interested in.

He was born November 26, 1931 in Chicago, Illinois. After graduating with class honors in philosophy from the University of Illinois in 1955, he spent time in a variety of occupations, from working in exploratory oil to being a science editor. While working as a marketing director in the early 1960s, Engelmann became interested with how children learn. This interest began with examining how much e ...more
Once you’ve seen science-based reading instruction delivered well, you’ll want it for your kids. For six years, Kristina Matuskiewicz, a kindergarten teacher at Edna C. Stevens Elementary School in Cromwell, CT, believed that, like all the teachers at her tidy suburban school, she was helping to make good readers. She read them stories, she identified words and described their meaning, she offered them a variety of good books and worked to shift them to independent reading. “Each teacher had their own approach to teaching reading,” says Matuskiewicz.
If you have concerns about your child's reading level at any time, talk to your child's teacher, school counselor, and doctor. Kids who are not making good reading progress might have a reading disability, such as dyslexia. With the right educational help, most kids can become readers, but identifying the problem and addressing it early will bring about the best results.
You can take part in training classes on many subjects, such as child rearing, job training, learning about health and nutrition, and using free resources in your own community. Some parents learn the English language; others learn to read. Head Start also offers assistance to parents interested in obtaining a high school General Equivalency Diploma (GED) or other adult education opportunities.
Predictable books can be bought through the internet and cost a dollar each.  Understand that predictable books have levels.  If your child is just starting out, start with beginning level books.  As kids get better at reading move to more complex books.  Look through the titles with you child and choose themes that appeal to them.  Put the books in a basket with your child's name on it, so that your child can read their book when they want.
Have your child practice decoding. Classically known as ‘sounding out’ words, decoding is when a child reads a word by making the sounds of each individual letter, rather than trying to read the whole word at once. Reading is broken up into two primary parts: decoding/reading a word, and comprehending its meaning. Don’t expect your child to recognize and comprehend words just yet; have them focus on decoding and sounding out word parts..
When your four-year-old knows the alphabet and shows an interest in language, he might be ready to read. You can teach this essential life skill at home, without expensive curriculum or a degree in early childhood education. You have already taught your child many life skills, such as dressing and using the toilet. Teaching your child to read simply takes time, patience and an awareness of your child's readiness.
On one point I disagree with you, and that is your implication that once a child can read on hir own, then henceforth it is clear sailing on the sea of learning all that the public and school libraries hold in their collections. Actually, learning how to read in the beginner sense is just a step on the way to learning how to read in the scholar sense. One guide for that is HOW TO READ A BOOK by Mortimer Adler. Doubtless you can find it at your public library, and Google finds free pdf copies online as well as bound copies for sale in both the original and revised editions and articles about the book, plus an online video of a TV series Adler did on the book long ago.
If your child is between the ages of one and nine, they will be able to experience reading in a whole new light. This is even true for children who show zero interest in reading. Long gone are the days of expensive tutors — now all you need is Reading Head Start. Children experience a program that is not only rewarding and encouraging, but gratifying as well.

Could it just be possible that if babies learn to speak from listening to words? Can children learn to read by listening to letters? How successful your child becomes in life, all comes down to these first few years? Are you worried about your child delayed learning disability and completely skeptical? Instead of teaching your child to read the word as a whole what if we separated each letter. Here, Reading Head Start creates even more advanced theories on how to quickly teach any child to read. This system is for teaching any child to read at any age 3 more weeks passed by still only spending 15 minutes per night, only 3 nights per week using this system. This system to make the reading system available to every single parent who loves their child wanting nothing but the best head start they can give them, to being successful in both school and life.


The key to increasing your child’s reading volume is motivation. Choose books that match your child’s interest. Or, explore reading with other media your child loves. Is she a fan of princesses? There is a world of online fairy tales for her to explore. Kids who love superheroes can enjoy easy-reader comic books. Don’t be too picky about what your child reads at this age. Captain Underpants may be more meaningful than Little House on the Prairie — and that’s fine!
I’ve taught 1st grade for five years. I’ve also taught 2nd and 4th. From my experience reading is not only about word call and decoding. Your child needs to look at the print, slide their finger under what they are reading, get their mouth ready and sound it out. Work with word families and use an easy reader that has the word family in it. When you begin a story reload the vocabulary. You can use magnetic letter, dry erase markers on a table to to sound out main words in the story. For example if you have an easy reader that uses the family -op, then work and teach words that are in the story like mop, top, etc. Then when the child sees the word in print in the context of the story they should be able to recognize the family and use decoding skills to figure out the word. Don’t ever tell them the word b/c then they will get use to having someone read the words to them and they do not use the strategies taught. One last thing, your daughter is only five. Fluent reading normally doesn’t kick in til mid first grade. She just may not be developmentally ready to just pick up a book and read. Keep doing what you are doing and use the suggestions above and you will see progress. Don’t stress. Your daughter is already ahead of most of her kinder peers already.
“If children don’t learn at an early age to enjoy reading, it will most likely hinder their ability sometime down the road.” I do not agree with your statement. My mother worked to support her family, and I didn’t have the opportunity to read books until school. I learned to read at 5 and was very successful throughout school/college. Not every child has the opportunity to be read to, or even access to books.
Nobody is better equipped to teach a child how to read than her own mom and dad. That's because reading involves more than sounding out words on a page. At its most powerful, reading is an emotional undertaking as well as an intellectual one—an interlacing of the written text with one's own life experiences. If a youngster is lucky, she gets to experience it as a warm, loving time when she sits on Mom's lap and turns the pages, walks to the library with Dad for afternoon story time, and cuddles in bed with her parents on Saturday morning as they read her favorite stories.
Even if the child is learning to read on her own, you should continue to read to her. At this age, your child will benefit from books that display the rich diversity of the world. Books about children of other nationalities, colors, cultures, races, sizes, and families will expand his view of the world. At the same time, books that relate to places and objects from her everyday reality like dolls, beds, homes, cars, trucks, and fire engines are also enjoyed. Books that talk about people she knows such as a friend, a baby sister, or a grandmother will help her develop closeness, understanding, and empathy for others. Books that describe imaginary creatures and far-away places can also inspire her imagination.
Could it just be possible that if babies learn to speak from listening to words? Can children learn to read by listening to letters? How successful your child becomes in life, all comes down to these first few years? Are you worried about your child delayed learning disability and completely skeptical? Instead of teaching your child to read the word as a whole what if we separated each letter. Here, Reading Head Start creates even more advanced theories on how to quickly teach any child to read. This system is for teaching any child to read at any age 3 more weeks passed by still only spending 15 minutes per night, only 3 nights per week using this system. This system to make the reading system available to every single parent who loves their child wanting nothing but the best head start they can give them, to being successful in both school and life.
​​​Hey Sarah, thanks for getting back to me! Yes Ellie has been doing fantastic with Reading Head Start. We just started level three on Tuesday and she's excited to get going. She loves your system so much that I'm not sure what to do next once she completes level four. You should keep making more levels lol. This has easily been the best investment I've made for Ellie to date and a bunch of my friends all picked it up for their children too. I'll keep you posted on her progress!" *Disclaimer: Individual results may vary.

I ordered this, not knowing it’s all online. I came across my payment email. As I watch a very long ...video thinking books were coming.you access all the program online. I think it’s way to much to be an online program. Never even had the chance to experience it in the month trial I had. Your video is convincing you cared to educate children make the world a more educated uplifting place. Never received a email encouraging me to hop on the program I just signed up for that never even had activity in. Only a payment email. I lost interest and canceled. See More
You will see results your very first day using Reading Head Start! You get to see first hand and for the first time, your child’s mind expanding and understanding letters and the sounds they make! After one week into the system, you’ll notice that what you’re teaching your child is starting to “stick” and from there, you watch as they quickly start to progress forward with amazing results!
This program isn’t just a collection of online books that children can practice reading. Instead, it’s a strategic approach to helping children learn how to read from a logical angle, by focusing on the different sounds each letter makes and how different letters can completely change the sound of a world when added, removed or paired with others. This allows your child to have a strong understanding of the letters before being asked to “sound out” words that, essentially, make zero sense to them.

​​​I purchased Reading Head Start for my 3-year-old daughter last year and she still loves it. Now, after one year, she is reading between 2nd and 4th grade levels. Obviously, we have been reading together through that time, but Reading Head Start was the right choice to teach her to sound out words and learn basic sight words. And we all love the letter sounds song!"  *Disclaimer: Individual results may vary.


Tap into prior knowledge. Before reading, parents should tap into their children's prior knowledge—priming the pump for deeper learning. For example, when reading Make Way for Ducklings, a mother might recall the day she and her daughter went to the park to feed the ducks and ask: “What do you remember about those ducks?” Before reading Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, a dad might reminisce about the time he and his son watched the heavy equipment at the construction site near their house, asking: “What vehicles do you remember seeing and what were they doing?”
From 24 – 36 months, your child needs to consolidate the basic learning that began in the previous year. She may be able to recite the alphabet, count to 10 and identify colors, shapes, animals and parts of the body. Popular favorites for this age group, for example, include Hand, Hand, Fingers, Thumb or The Nose Book and The Ear Book by Al Perkins.

The Reading Head Start program is broken up into four individual levels, each one consisting of easy learn reading videos, work books, and fun exercise and games. With just 15 minutes, three nights per week, parents can help their children as young as two years old learn to read within 30 days, even if they can’t recite the alphabet correctly yet. The system helps kids learn to begin mastering the basics and then progresses them to more advanced reading skills in a fun and exciting way.

Thanks for these ideas! I’ve got a (just turned) 2 year old, and he loves his letters. And he loves when I read to him. I feel like he might love learning basic words (which letters form the words he already likes to say), and then he would REALLY love reading. Most of these ideas are advanced for him, but I gives me some ideas for moving forward. Thanks!
Researchers discovered that children with reading problems are not identical and that some students were better able to benefit from specific interventions than others. Using brain recordings, they were able to tell the difference between which students would respond better years later. Continuing research like this may one day help tailor specific approaches to individual students, so that more people with reading problems can learn to read successfully.
Learning to read can be a long process, so it is never too early to prepare a child. While learning to read is a big milestone, it is important that the learning process be fun and engaging for the child. Reading should be something that the child comes to enjoy and can use to gain even more knowledge through books. If you remain patient and make the learning process a fun way to spend time together, it will give the child the best chance to successfully learn to read and love books.

Books for babies should have simple, repetitive text and clear pictures. During the first few months of life, your child just likes to hear your voice, so you can read almost anything, especially books with a sing-song or rhyming text. As your baby gets more interested in looking at things, choose books with simple pictures against solid backgrounds.
In general, a major part of teaching a child to read is to also develop a love of reading alongside. This will give the child a natural motivation to read their favourite books, making the task of teaching reading to them a lot easier! These readers will likely not develop that, so I would recommend that you read to your child on a daily basis outside of this program. Buy your child a bank of excellent children's books that they will grow to love.
Introduce blends. Blends are consonant sounds that appear together frequently, such as "bl" and "gr." Show your child how to make each sound independently first and then say the sounds faster until they blend. For example, to teach the "bl" blend, you would say "buh" "lll." Then repeat the two sounds a little faster until you say "bl" as in "blend."

My child hated reading and used to fight me when it was time to do her reading assignments. I’m ashamed to say it took me awhile to realize she wasn’t being disobedient—she was frustrated by the fact she was struggling to read and simply too young to express it. I researched online and found Reading Head Start. I’m always skeptical about things on the internet, but I was at my wit’s end at not knowing how to help my child. I’m glad I took a chance. The program worked for us!
Read Naturally aims to improve reading fluency and understanding in kids and adults. It uses texts, audio CDs and computer software. Usually students listen to a story and then read the same text aloud. The program tracks progress carefully. Students work at their own level and move through the program at their own rate. Usually they work independently. Read Naturally is most often used as an add-on to the main program being used in the general education classroom.
Thanks for these ideas! I’ve got a (just turned) 2 year old, and he loves his letters. And he loves when I read to him. I feel like he might love learning basic words (which letters form the words he already likes to say), and then he would REALLY love reading. Most of these ideas are advanced for him, but I gives me some ideas for moving forward. Thanks!

Are you concerned that your child might have a learning disability? As with almost any disability, early intervention can prevent problems in the future. In the preschool years, speech delays are much more noticeable than the learning disabilities that may affect a child’s efforts to read. Ask your pediatrician for advice if you are concerned that your child is speech delayed.
The recommended age range for a middle-grade novel is not usually apparent on the book itself. You can find it on a publisher’s site (sometimes!) or in a reputable review, but keep in mind that your child may — or may not — be ready for a book with some content that skews older. If your child brings home a book you object to, you will have to decide where you stand on censoring your child’s reading choices. But keep in mind that with books — as opposed to movies or TV shows — children can easily tune out or skip over material they’re not emotionally ready for.
A timeless series that millions of Americans have learned to read on, Dick and Jane Books are true classics. Like all good beginner readers, these books are made up of short, high-frequency words that are frequently repeated. They also have different levels associated with them, so depending on where your child is at, you can either start at the very beginning or jump in at the appropriate level.
Develop phonemic awareness. One of the most important steps in teaching reading is associating a spoken sound with a letter or letter-pair. This process is known as phonemic awareness. There are 44 speech sounds created by the 26 letters in our alphabet, and each sound must be taught paired with its letter(s) counterpart. This includes the long and short sound produced by each individual letter, as well as the specialized sounds some combined letters make (like ‘ch’ and ‘sh’).
Books with mirrors and different textures (crinkly, soft, scratchy) are also great for this age group, as are fold-out books that can be propped up, or books with flaps that open for a surprise. Board books make page turning easier for infants and vinyl or cloth books can go everywhere — even the tub. Babies of any age like photo albums with pictures of people they know and love. And every baby should have a collection of nursery rhymes!
Kid's can learn of the above mentioned strategies simultaneously. When we teach kids to recognize words by their shape, we teach them site words. Some whole words are considered "sight words"--words that you don't usually use letter sounds to figure out. The word 'the' is a great example of a site word. The word 'the' starts with the /th/ sound. Beginning readers usually don't have any understanding of how the 'th' spelling makes a sound like /th/. As it turns out, kids can recognize the word 'the' even if they don't have a grasp of the letter sound in it.
Your child will learn how to decode words into sounds and encode sounds into words when they write and spell. This all happens within a wide range of activities that feel like games, to keep your child interested and engaged as they practice. Each lesson ends with a book matched to your child’s current ability, which lets them enjoy the thrill of reading on their own.
As your child becomes a more confident reader, continue to introduce a wide range of books. When it comes to reading aloud, look for two types of books — those that could be read alone and those that are above your child's current independent reading level. With this mix, your child can re-read some of these books independently, while you'll have to do the reading (or at least help) with the challenging ones that allow your child to enjoy a more sophisticated story and learn new words.
Her video tells the story of her Kindergarten aged child receiving his very first grade report, and how shocked she was that he was “failing English” and how embarrassing that was for an English teacher. Except Kindergartners don’t have an “English” grade, not now or ever. Parents are simply told whether or not their child is struggling or achieving in a variety of skills based areas. 
Make reading rewarding by asking for your child’s ideas and opinions about his books. You can even help your child create a video “book talk” about a favorite book. Just turn on the camera, and ask him to say the title and author and to describe the story. Then, ask him to explain what he did and didn’t like about the book. When he doesn’t know what to say, ask him a question like, “What was your favorite part?” or “What could the characters do if the story kept going?” Grandparents, aunts, and uncles will treasure this video keepsake.
Picture books are bigger than board books, with (be careful!) rippable pages and, usually, a slightly longer, more developed story. You can introduce picture books into the story time mix right from the newborn days, but the sweet spot for picture books is later toddlerhood and beyond. Your child’s awareness of the world is always expanding, and picture books tell more ambitious stories, going to new places, and helping the child to understand and navigate each stage of life (a new sibling, the beginning of preschool, conflict with a friend, fear of the dark, picky eating, and so on).

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I realize many people have had success with this book but we did not. My children hated, just HATED this book. I do not want my children to hate reading. I want them to love reading so I quit using the book after only a few tries. It is not a child-friendly book. The book is structured like a textbook (columns, heavy text, few pictures, no color, chapters, etc.) and oversized like a textbook, which is inappropriate for a small child. I can understand why adults like this book as it is more appro ...more
Reading Head Start can help you educate your youngster how to study permitting them to build important existence expertise and self confidence. This specific stimulates good results from the several years to follow since youngsters that be in the program typically examine with a amount 2 4 a long time over the age of them. With thousands of several hours price of looking at lessons are organized according to various expertise levels.
This is an amazing hub! I have a son whose just about to turn 3 and he's known all his letters since before he was 2 and he now knows all the sounds as well. I have been thinking it was time to try to teach him to read, but I wasn't sure how to get him to sound out words. With your approach he doesn't have to. Now I'll be making flash cards of those 100 words! He already reads books... but I'm almost positive its from memory not from recognizing the words.
Hi, I have a friend who lets her 6-month old son watch “baby can read” videos every day. She did the same with her older child, who, at 1 year old, is able to “read” words. Her daughter can decode common words such as house, but when the letters are jumbled so as to form another word, she couldn’t read it any more. I now have a one year old daughter. She’s recommending that I expose my baby to it too. What is your opinion on this? on the exposure of children to screen media?
In Conclusion, Reading Head Start is highly recommended! This program is a must have for your child where it actually had made this as much about parents as you have the kids. You know you child will absolutely love this system. Shape this educational reading system to be what it is today. I’m so confident you had never before had there been a reading curriculum so easy and effective. Reading Head Start is truly unlike anything out there and is getting better every single day as more content is being added such as reading games and worksheets. Even a child with zero computer experience can use it on their own as well! And your child uses this program, the better they will become at reading. If for any reason you decide not to keep this system within the next 365 days from now! Get a copy of Reading Head Start, and set your child on the path to lifelong success.
​When teaching young children (especially those under 6 years old) I would recommend you teach them phonics in short sharp bursts on a daily basis. I noticed some of the later lessons could run to over 30 minutes based on their guidelines. Unless your child is clearly able to focus for this long, I would recommend that you do that lesson over two days to lessen the burden on your child.
In today’s education system, being able to read at an early age is definitely a great advantage for our children. As parents surely we want our children to be able to grasp the concepts of what being taught at school, in any subject without any difficulties in the future. To do that, it’s better for them to start early and get a head start on their reading skills.
Great list, and wonderful summary. I particularly love the emphasis on making it fun and creative and incorporated into different aspects of life. I used a very similar list when documenting my experiences teaching my kids to read at howitaughtmykidstoread.wordpress.com. I’ll definitely be using your post in a future post of my own, and hope you will take a look at my site and let me know what you think. Thanks!
Don’t forget nonfiction. Some reluctant readers are fact-gatherers, who may be more inspired by reading nonfiction. If it’s presented in a highly visual format, all the better for conveying even more kinds of information. Look for books about presidents, states, ancient history, the solar system, animals, natural disasters, and other topics they’re interested in.
By taking pictures of readers’ brains as the students were reading, researchers observed which parts of the brain were active during the reading process. The researchers also saw that the active areas of the brain differed slightly for poor readers and for good readers. After using an intervention to help poor readers become better readers and overcome reading difficulties, the brain activity patterns of the poor readers during reading changed to look more like those who did not have reading problems. For more on this finding, visit http://www.nichd.nih.gov/news/releases/Pages/brain_function.aspx.
Thank you for the information and to everyone else with their questions/replies. I am a single parent who has just recently started reading heavily with my 5 year old. He is aware of the sounds and has a few of the basic words down, but struggles with reading. This really makes me frustrated, but after reading this post/comments I am glad to know that what I am forcing him to do is way ahead of his time. Pushing him to read every night and being angry when he doesn’t remember might hinder him from future learning and I definitely do not want to do that. He truly enjoys the last part of the night where we open the books together and I want that feeling to last forever. I greatly appreciate the advice and will completely back off of my son as he still has time to grow into reading whole stories. Due to a late birthday he is currently in Pre-K so I think the pressure of wanting him to do well in school, being a single parent, and my own childhood misfortunes are having a negative impact on me. I plan to regroup for tomorrow nights reading and take things a lot slower with him and make sure that he knows that he is doing a great job. Thank you so much for you have saved me from me in a way.
In other words, reading Dr. Seuss's The Cat in the Hat is an incredibly complex task that requires significant understanding beyond just being able to sound out words. It's based as much on a knowledge of how the world works as it is on how language works. So even though a toddler or a preschooler may not be ready to translate letters into phonemes into words, she is able to start gaining the contextual grounding that will allow her to give those words meaning. "From birth forward, children are becoming readers and writers," says Cox. "Their listening, drawing, early wordplay, pretend reading, storytelling, and scribbling all set the stage for reading excellence and a love of books and writing later on."
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Yes, it certainly is a balance! No greater emphasis should be put on one area over the others (with the exception of reading comprehension). Sight words are typically extremely beneficial for early readers who get frustrated when words don’t follow the “rules”. This is the only area of reading where I feel like memorization is beneficial, in context with all the other reading strategies, of course.
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