Get your baby talking. Babies may start making sounds in response to your reading. This is why many books for this age contain nonsense words or animal sounds — they’re easier to mimic. Try it: If your child make a noise, respond. It may make no sense to you, but it’s communication. There’s a straight line from this moment to your first parent-child book club.
As your child's reading skills improve, he or she will begin to read independently. This doesn’t mean, however, that you should stop reading to your child. Reading aloud together can help build vocabulary, improve reading skills, and foster a sense of closeness between you and your child. Encourage discussion about characters and share your reactions to books to help reinforce the connection between what you read and everyday life.
First grade teacher Angela DiStefano, a 12-year teaching veteran, says the Literacy How approach to reading has changed her professional life forever. “Before that, I thought it was my job to teach kids to share my enthusiasm for reading.” Now, she teaches them to read with explicit instruction on how to sound out words. Not long ago, she gave a seminar for first grade parents to teach them some rules about vowels (for example: vowels make their short sound in closed pattern words like tap and the long sound in open pattern words like hi, so, and my) so parents could reinforce the lessons at home.
Tap into prior knowledge. Before reading, parents should tap into their children's prior knowledge—priming the pump for deeper learning. For example, when reading Make Way for Ducklings, a mother might recall the day she and her daughter went to the park to feed the ducks and ask: “What do you remember about those ducks?” Before reading Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, a dad might reminisce about the time he and his son watched the heavy equipment at the construction site near their house, asking: “What vehicles do you remember seeing and what were they doing?”

“Phonemes” are the smallest sounds in the English language (go here for a complete list of phonemes).  These sounds are made up of consonants, short vowels, long vowels, and digraphs.  “Phonemic Awareness” consists of learning those sounds and how to manipulate them within a word.  Digraphs are unique sounds comprised of individual letters like /th/, /sh/, /ch/, etc.
Let your children become members as soon as they are old enough. A child’s first library card is a rite of passage, often the very first official membership card in a young life. Teach your children that library membership is a privilege and a responsibility. Most children really treasure their library cards, for good reason. It’s not just a ticket to great books, it’s a milestone.

We know that you and your child are going to absolutely love Reading Head Start, yet if for any reason you decide not to keep the system from now, to all the way until one year from now. You can get every cent of your money back at any time. In fact, we don’t personally handle the refunds at all, making it truly trustworthy. All credit card transactions and refunds are handled by a secure third party. That means if you unfortunately decide on being refunded, you’re issued a prompt frictionless refund that same day automatically!
Thanks for your post…can I ask you for some advice??? My 5 year old knows all the parts of reading, but isn’t reading on her own yet. What I mean is she knows all her letter names and sounds, knows how to sound out words, knows several dozen sight words, knows to read a book from front to back, top to bottom, left to right, etc. But something isn’t clicking. If I had to guess its like she thinks she should have every word memorized and she should just know all the words by sight, and if she doesn’t, then in her mind, she can’t read it. I’m at a loss to help her over this seemingly final hurdle. Sorry to bother you with my personal situation, but your post on reading caught me on a day that I’ve really been stressing over this. Any advice is much appreciated.
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The method that Sarah uses in the program is essentially top secret unless you buy the package. She claims that it is a reading method that “the education system does not want you to know” and she is sharing it all inside. Sarah also claims that the method is “scientifically verified” and guaranteed to have your child reading at least two levels above their current age and grade.
They use animals to create a “safe space” for children to work out problems. The ranks of great picture books have always been heavy with animal protagonists, as in “Little Bear,” “Frog and Toad” and “Pete the Cat.” It’s not just that children love animals — the critters in their books help them reflect on problems from a safe emotional distance. Animals are also often gender neutral and appeal to both sexes.
At 6-7, many children are interested in chapter books that are a bit more challenging than they can handle on their own. Let your child pick a book she would love to read and take turns reading paragraphs or pages to each other. If your child gets tired of reading, you can always read aloud as she follows along. You’ll enjoy talking about the characters and plot of the story that you are experiencing together.
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In today’s education system, being able to read at an early age is definitely a great advantage for our children. As parents surely we want our children to be able to grasp the concepts of what being taught at school, in any subject without any difficulties in the future. To do that, it’s better for them to start early and get a head start on their reading skills.
​​​Hey Sarah, thanks for getting back to me! Yes Ellie has been doing fantastic with Reading Head Start. We just started level three on Tuesday and she's excited to get going. She loves your system so much that I'm not sure what to do next once she completes level four. You should keep making more levels lol. This has easily been the best investment I've made for Ellie to date and a bunch of my friends all picked it up for their children too. I'll keep you posted on her progress!" *Disclaimer: Individual results may vary.
Most children learn to read by 6 or 7 years of age. Some children learn at 4 or 5 years of age. Even if a child has a head start, she may not stay ahead once school starts. The other students most likely will catch up during the second or third grade. Pushing your child to read before she is ready can get in the way of your child's interest in learning. Children who really enjoy learning are more likely to do well in school. This love of learning cannot be forced.
The principal, Lucille DiTunno, decided the school needed to take another approach. First, she asked her teachers to establish a “literacy block” — 90 minutes a day dedicated to reading. Three years ago, DiTunno paid $28,000 to Literacy How, then a division of Haskins Laboratories in New Haven, to bring consultants to the school every week for a full year to teach teachers about the scientifically proven methods that help kids learn to read.
Introduce your own taste. You’ve been reading a long time, and you have a sense of what you like in grown-up books. As a parent, you have the chance to rediscover your taste in children’s books. Pull out your old favorites, and find what’s new that catches your eye when you’re in bookstores, libraries or friends’ homes. The good news is that the best authors and illustrators of children’s books aim to please their grown-up audience, too. Try it: Tweak the text when you’re reading out loud. Many classic children’s books are now considered sexist, racist, outdated and, in certain ways, downright awful. Feel free to make them better.
Reading Mastery is very systematic. It starts by teaching word sounds and what the corresponding letters and words look like. Next, kids learn to read passages. Then they build vocabulary while increasing their understanding of what they read. Students are grouped by reading level. Reading Mastery is often used by general and special education teachers as a complement to other programs. It may also be used on its own. Teachers tend to use one of two versions. Reading Mastery Classic is for grades K–3 and Reading Mastery Plus is taught in grades K–6.

Set a positive example by reading books. If a child notices that you are enjoying a book, he will be more likely to develop an interest in reading as well. Try to read around them for about 20 minutes each day. If the child gets curious about what you're doing you can tell him about the book you are reading, or take the opportunity to ask if the child would like to find a book to read.


Decoding is often referred to as “sounding it out.”  This is an important element in teaching your child to read, but it certainly isn’t the most important.  Once your child knows the sounds each letter makes (which is taught in real, meaningful situations), she is ready to begin putting words together.  When looking at a short word, encourage her to say each individual sound /b/, /a/, /t/,  and then put them together “bat”.
Why should it not be done? Unless it is stressing the child out or forcing him I do not see why it “SHOULDN’T” be done. That is a nice analogy but I don’t see how it is a valid one. Just because a child I advanced or allowed to be ahead of the game does not mean they are not being allowed to be a child. Maybe he is gifted maybe not perhaps he is interested in learning. Children love to learn so yes I agree Let him be a child.
I purchased the lifetime subscription which states 1 full year money back guarantee. I submitted my request for refund just outside the payee’s (clickbank) refund period. So the request was escalated to the company for refund. I just made my third request within the last 2 weeks & no one has tried to contact me. There is no other contact, you have to rely on clickbank to get in touch with whoever can approve this. Clickbank automatically closes the request in 10 days, so I had to reopen the case...I can tell that getting my money back isn’t easy. I’m certain there are many reviews like mine which get wiped illegally. Anything to make a buck I guess.

When children classify a book into a certain genre, they have to first summarize the book in their head and recall details.  Then they have to use that information to decide which type of genre that particular books fits into.  Finally, your child will be recalling details from other books in the same genre, making connections between the two.  This simple activity that might take 5-10 seconds of your time after reading a book but it certainly packs a punch of thought and processing in that young brain!

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