Tap into prior knowledge. Before reading, parents should tap into their children's prior knowledge—priming the pump for deeper learning. For example, when reading Make Way for Ducklings, a mother might recall the day she and her daughter went to the park to feed the ducks and ask: “What do you remember about those ducks?” Before reading Mike Mulligan and His Steam Shovel, a dad might reminisce about the time he and his son watched the heavy equipment at the construction site near their house, asking: “What vehicles do you remember seeing and what were they doing?”

Decades of research support the fact that parental involvement in a child’s school learning will promote that child’s success. If you have access to the material your child is reading at school, make time to read it yourself. You can show how important reading for school is by participating in it with your child.  By staying on top of your child’s school reading, you can avoid the perennial non-conversation: “How was school?” “Fine.”
In Conclusion, Reading Head Start is highly recommended! This program is a must have for your child where it actually had made this as much about parents as you have the kids. You know you child will absolutely love this system. Shape this educational reading system to be what it is today. I’m so confident you had never before had there been a reading curriculum so easy and effective. Reading Head Start is truly unlike anything out there and is getting better every single day as more content is being added such as reading games and worksheets. Even a child with zero computer experience can use it on their own as well! And your child uses this program, the better they will become at reading. If for any reason you decide not to keep this system within the next 365 days from now! Get a copy of Reading Head Start, and set your child on the path to lifelong success.
Create daily opportunities to build your child's reading skills by creating a print‑rich environment at home. Seeing printed words (on posters, charts, books, labels etc.) enables children to see and apply connections between sounds and letter symbols. When you're out and about, point out letters on posters, billboards and signs. In time you can model sounding out the letters to make words. Focus on the first letter in words. Ask your child “What sound is that letter?” “What other word starts with that sound?” “What word rhymes with that word?”
I have a 6 year old son who had some pretty significant delays due to liver disease. I never thought he would take off reading the way he has! He's doing so well with your program he will not have to repeat kindergarten. We are so pleased with your reading program! And super excited our son gets to go into first grade all because his reading skills are so good! He's a better reader than most of his friends his age who have never had delays or medical issues.
When your child is able to read books, you can fine tune their reading more easily. You can also spend more time on the basics, ensuring that they read better than even children who are older than them. This will ensure that when they get to school (if you’re not home schooling), they will be fully prepared and can have more fun and be more relaxed in their classes; and when learning is fun it is more easily retained.
If your child is reading and comes to a difficult or unfamiliar word, encourage "sounding it out" or breaking the word into smaller parts to read one part at a time. If the word still is too hard, suggest skipping it and reading the rest of the sentence, then thinking about what word would make sense in that context ("What do you think would work in this sentence?"). 
My son began to struggle with reading when he transitioned from short children’s books to chapter books for kids. It was then that his teacher and I noticed that he was reading much slower than the other children; she recommended that I work with him after school, but I didn’t know where to start. Reading Head Start was the answer. My boy is reading so much faster now and feels confident when reading out loud in class. We’re both happy!
I’ve taught 1st grade for five years. I’ve also taught 2nd and 4th. From my experience reading is not only about word call and decoding. Your child needs to look at the print, slide their finger under what they are reading, get their mouth ready and sound it out. Work with word families and use an easy reader that has the word family in it. When you begin a story reload the vocabulary. You can use magnetic letter, dry erase markers on a table to to sound out main words in the story. For example if you have an easy reader that uses the family -op, then work and teach words that are in the story like mop, top, etc. Then when the child sees the word in print in the context of the story they should be able to recognize the family and use decoding skills to figure out the word. Don’t ever tell them the word b/c then they will get use to having someone read the words to them and they do not use the strategies taught. One last thing, your daughter is only five. Fluent reading normally doesn’t kick in til mid first grade. She just may not be developmentally ready to just pick up a book and read. Keep doing what you are doing and use the suggestions above and you will see progress. Don’t stress. Your daughter is already ahead of most of her kinder peers already.

I agree this is an awesome price, and in general I admire This Reading Mama a lot! I wish I knew about her curriculum 3 years ago when I taught my daughter to read starting before she was even 3. I used http://progressivephonics.com/. It’s also free, and comes with the same hassle of downloading and printing all the material. It was totally worth it though as Ms Smarty Pants was reading fluently at 3.5. So, yes, I am very much with you – you CAN teach your preschooler to read.
This is a user-friendly program. You can go through each lesson at your own pace. Every day they came from school they wanted to hop on the computer to learn more because it felt like a game to them. At the same time, it helped them learn to read and write. I got their report card and met with their teachers, they we're both above average in their class.
Create daily opportunities to build your child's reading skills by creating a print‑rich environment at home. Seeing printed words (on posters, charts, books, labels etc.) enables children to see and apply connections between sounds and letter symbols. When you're out and about, point out letters on posters, billboards and signs. In time you can model sounding out the letters to make words. Focus on the first letter in words. Ask your child “What sound is that letter?” “What other word starts with that sound?” “What word rhymes with that word?”
This program is the “gold standard” for teaching reading to kids with dyslexia. It focuses at the word level by teaching the connections between letters and sounds. Orton–Gillingham also uses what’s called a multisensory approach. It taps into sight, sound, movement and touch to help kids link language to words. Students learn the rules and patterns behind why and how letters make the sounds they do. Orton–Gillingham is the basis for a number of other reading programs. These programs are mostly used by special education teachers.
According to Shane Michaels, “The entire premise of Reading Head Start really just makes sense—like how babies learn to speak by listening, Sarah Shephard uses the same principles of teaching kids how to read by having them listen to the sounds the individual letters make, rather than them just memorizing the association between words and certain images, the method most kids learn to read by in school. But perhaps what is most impressive about this system is that it is designed in a way to get parents involved with their child’s learning process in reading, so their child gets much more of a benefit than simply learning how to read words. They get a complete learning experience that is positive, encouraging, and gratifying.”

​​My 2 year old son absolutely goes mental for Reading Head Start! He's actually choosing the members area over television and its the first thing he wants to do when he wakes up after his nap. No word of a lie but I absolutely get why. If I was his age again, I'd  love it too! Just wanted to send out my quick thanks!" *Disclaimer: Individual results may vary.
I've been supplementing my first grader's school curriculum with some enrichment activities at home. Though I wanted to boost her academic achievement, I also wanted to ensure she would be engaged with the lessons at home, so picking the right learning resources was very important. I found the Daily Word Ladders (Grades 1-2) to be an excellent, fun, and creative resource. You can pace the lessons (which come in the form of reproducible word study lessons) according to your child's (or in the case of classroom teachers, children) aptitude and interest level. We work on two pages every other day, and my daughter has so much fun, she actually requests that we work on more than two pages at a time.
Could it just be possible that if babies learn to speak from listening to words? Can children learn to read by listening to letters? How successful your child becomes in life, all comes down to these first few years? Are you worried about your child delayed learning disability and completely skeptical? Instead of teaching your child to read the word as a whole what if we separated each letter. Here, Reading Head Start creates even more advanced theories on how to quickly teach any child to read. This system is for teaching any child to read at any age 3 more weeks passed by still only spending 15 minutes per night, only 3 nights per week using this system. This system to make the reading system available to every single parent who loves their child wanting nothing but the best head start they can give them, to being successful in both school and life.
When I was teaching my kids to read, I tried to find books with only short words, thinking that they would make it easier to learn reading. But I couldn’t find any such books. Could I write one? What about using words only 3-letters long? Yes. Then what about 2-letter words? That would be a challenge, but I listed the 2-letter words and made a story. I published it as a free ebook so that anyone may access it. I hope this book, along with material on this websites and from other sources, may help your child or student learn to read. Here it is: http://www.wegotobo.com
Kid's can learn of the above mentioned strategies simultaneously. When we teach kids to recognize words by their shape, we teach them site words. Some whole words are considered "sight words"--words that you don't usually use letter sounds to figure out. The word 'the' is a great example of a site word. The word 'the' starts with the /th/ sound. Beginning readers usually don't have any understanding of how the 'th' spelling makes a sound like /th/. As it turns out, kids can recognize the word 'the' even if they don't have a grasp of the letter sound in it.
"When I first began to teach kindergarten 26 years ago, we didn't even start the alphabet until Christmastime," says Carol Schrecengost, a teacher in Stow, OH. "But now I begin teaching letter sounds during the first month of school  -- in part because students are learning their letters earlier, but also because parents and administrators expect it."

I have a 7 year old with autism. He is in public school autism class (first grade). When he was a toddler all he wanted to do was listen to books. Now I cannot sit him down. He literally fights me and my 3 year old (who is homeschooling) makes it harder because she gets jealous and throws fits during the time I try to make him sit down and look at a book. He is nowhere near reading now.
Dear Anna, thank you so much for always sharing amazing works with us, you can’t believe if I tell you I spend much time reading your notes and ideas every day, today I was reading it and suddenly found out that I am on net for about 4 hours, wow your job is amazing, I really love teaching and great ideas and fun which you show us make reading very interesting, God bless you and your family, I wish all your dreams come true, amen. My lil kids will pray for you because you make them happy I will tell them about you all the time.
The strategy for learning sight words is, "See the word, say the word". Learning to identify and read sight words is essential for young children to become fluent readers. Most children will be able to learn a few sight words at the age of four (e.g. is, it, my, me, no, see, and we) and around 20 sight words by the end of their first year of school. You can teach sight words by playing with flashcards and using reading programs like ABC Reading Eggs.
Great article! It is SO important to keep our kids focused! I started this business 5 years ago and it has been so amazing impacting so many families. My favorite client was a 3 year old boy, Mikey, who had trouble BEGINNING to read. 5 years later, he STILL loves to read! He can’t put the books down! His confidence was the most amazing impact on his family. I gotta say, I love my job!

Don’t forget nonfiction. Some reluctant readers are fact-gatherers, who may be more inspired by reading nonfiction. If it’s presented in a highly visual format, all the better for conveying even more kinds of information. Look for books about presidents, states, ancient history, the solar system, animals, natural disasters, and other topics they’re interested in.
I’m not sure who learned more in that group, them or me. What I do know is, there’s no reason for you to struggle with developing a reading-teaching roadmap from scratch. Start with pre-reading skills. Then move through letters, blending, sight words, word families, and other phonics skills. Allow time for review and the natural development of the child.

Lessons 1-20: Let me start by being perfectly honest with you. The first 5 lessons were tortuous for both me and my 5 year old son. He does not like to sit still, he does not like to repeat things over and over again, and it was extremely confusing for both him and myself as we began this book. I was still getting used to the teaching aspect, and he was getting used to the sitting still and repeating sounds over and over and over again. I nearly gave up after the first 5 days. You may want to as well. PERSEVERE!
Reading Head Start will help you teach your child how to read, allowing them to build key life skills and self-confidence. This encourages success in the years to follow, as children who participate in the program often read at a level 2-4 years older than them. With thousands of hours worth of reading, lessons are organized based on varying skills levels.
"When I first began to teach kindergarten 26 years ago, we didn't even start the alphabet until Christmastime," says Carol Schrecengost, a teacher in Stow, OH. "But now I begin teaching letter sounds during the first month of school  -- in part because students are learning their letters earlier, but also because parents and administrators expect it."

Sarah Shepard is not only a mom, but a teacher. After teaching for 14+ years, she created a system that utilizes a very special reading method. Her six-year-old had come home one day with a poor English grade, which motivated her to take action. She wanted her children and thousands of other children to get the best possible start in life. Reading is an essential skill, which is why Sarah developed this scientifically-verified program.


Around Lesson 8, something changed in my son. He caught on. A switch flipped in his little mind and he began putting the pieces together about slowly sounding out the letters without pausing...and noticing how he was suddenly READING A WORD! He was stunned. I was stunned. The method works, everyone. It is monotonous and repetitive, but it works. Sounding out the words without pauses between each letter is brilliant. The dot method used in this book is brilliant. He uses his fingers to move to each new dot and sound and it keeps his mind on track.

I tried this program and was very disappointed. It was advertised as having videos and games but what I got access to was a website with written lessons only, no videos no games. The way the lessons were written also seem geared more toward a classroom/ group setting. If I had fallowed the program as I received it I think it would have helped but I wasn’t going to spend $297 for it. I thought what I received may have been a mistake or I was missing something so I tried to message the company through there website but was unable to do so as I would always get an error message when I hit send. So I contacted click bank (the company you pay through) and they are going to refund me the money.


Reluctance to try something new. The early chapter book mega-series franchises also hog up valuable shelf space in libraries and bookstores, so make an effort to introduce your little fan to newer, lesser known series, many of which are more literary, nuanced reads, with better art and more interesting language. The books in some of these series are best read in order, but with many your child can jump in at any point.
Studies show that children with weak phonological awareness become weak readers. Parents can almost guarantee their youngsters will become proficient readers by starting early with phonological awareness. They should forget flashcards, workbooks, and pricey kits such as “Hooked on Phonics” and just keep it fun, light, and simple. Phonological awareness is about being silly with words, making it a game, and celebrating the magic of language. There's no need for parents to sit their children down and give formal lessons. Instead, parents should teach it throughout the day in a fun and organic way by remembering the mantra: When you're out and about, sound it out:
Feel free to use ideas at your home, school or anywhere else you learn and play. If you wish to share any posts or photographs from this site on your blog or website, please make sure to abide by the following copyright guidelines:-Use Only 1 Photo -Maximum of 1-2 sentence description -Include a link to the ORIGINAL postPlease do not repost/duplicate more than 1-2 sentences of the tutorial or distribute printed content without written permission from the original author. Please do not use ANY of the photographs on this website on Instagram.

ABC Reading Eggs incorporates all five components of reading in its online lessons. Children are introduced to a range of interactive activities that reinforce letter sounds and symbols, building phonemic awareness and phonics skills, as well as vocabulary and comprehension. The e‑book at the end of each lesson allows children to apply the skills they have learned. Free trial.
With four levels in total, children of all ages can benefit. With 10 weeks worth of lessons in each level, your child will benefit from thousands of reading hours. Education is the key to success and by encouraging children to start reading sooner, they can develop key life skills that will promote long-term growth. She is now helping thousands of children improve their reading skills, supporting their future success.
Hi, Tonya! I’m right there with you on preferring half day kindergarten. I choose that for my kids too, even though with my daughter I was only one of 3 parents (out of 31 students) who did. It sounds like you’ve done a GREAT job on pre-reading skills with your daughter. I am going to post something next week about what kids need to know BEFORE sounding out. That might clear up a few things for you… but I’d like to know more about what you’ve tried. Did you try a lesson of Reading the Alphabet? What specifically was the trouble? You’re welcome to email me instead of carry this on through the comment thread. 🙂 themeasuredmom@gmail.com
Introduce blends. Blends are consonant sounds that appear together frequently, such as "bl" and "gr." Show your child how to make each sound independently first and then say the sounds faster until they blend. For example, to teach the "bl" blend, you would say "buh" "lll." Then repeat the two sounds a little faster until you say "bl" as in "blend."
In practical terms it works like this: a child destined to become a poor reader and a child destined to become a good reader can both understand the word “bag,” but the poor reader may not be able to clap for each of the three sounds in the word or to know that the last sound is what distinguishes “bag” from “bad.” If a child struggles to hear individual sounds that make up words, that child is likely to stumble when you try to teach her, for example, that the letter t makes the “tuh” sound. This becomes a real problem when we ask those kids to execute the neurological triple backflip known as reading.
Books belong everywhere. Even a devoted anticlutter person should make an exception for books. Create impromptu reading opportunities for your child by leaving books in places where they may be picked up in an idle moment. Discovered on a coffee table, a great photography book or a book about lizards may occupy children for long stretches. A big, visual, information-rich book like David Macaulay’s “The Way Things Work” can be an ongoing temptation for children of all ages. But don’t stop there. Leave paperbacks and magazines piled in the bathroom (yes, everyone reads on the toilet, even children), or anywhere they could catch a young reader’s eye.

Don’t push Harry Potter too early. We love Harry Potter, but also feel there is no reason to read Harry Potter out loud to your child. If children are attracted to fantasy, they will come to love Harry so much, they’ll want to read the books on their own. In other words, Harry Potter is the dessert, not the vegetables. There are a lot of great books for kindergartners, but even the first Harry Potter book is not one of them. In fact, the sweet spot for the first four books in the series is the second through fifth grades; it’s fifth through seventh grade for the later books. There are some dark themes in the later books; the author, J.K. Rowling, wrote those understanding that her readers would grow into the later books as they worked their way through the series.
While they might not be the most thrilling of stories for you, Bob Books are perfect for a child who is just starting to read. This series is made up of several small books that are a few pages long. Each book is filled with short three letter words and simple sentences. They are a good way to build your child’s confidence and encourage him to want to read more.
Teach your child the alphabet. When your child has developed word awareness, begin breaking down words into individual letters. Although the alphabet song is the most classic means of teaching the alphabet, try getting creative. Explain each of the letters with their name, but don’t worry about trying to incorporate the sounds the letters make yet.

6. example you will have several training in whole. This is the same design and style all through weeks 2 40. Whenever filling out each and every lessons young children full physical exercises as well as actions. As a result the educational expertise more enjoyable plus much more rewarding The outcomes may genuinely be life changing promoting a child's experience throughout their university a long time. In summary I recommend this unique Reading Head Start software for every parent who want their young children turn out to be properly informed. As soon as you log in towards the My own Jump Associates place right now your son or daughter will love anyone permanently since they find out limitless fun looking at games that will keep these things interested along with understanding pertaining to months. This particular award winning sport s
At this age, your child may change roles from being the listener to being the speaker. Now it is your turn to listen attentively as the child tells a story, asks questions, describes a problem, expresses an emotion or requests something. The child may turn the tables and tell you the story from a favourite book, or play the part of one of the characters in the book. This game heightens the child's sense of enjoyment while reading and should be encouraged.
The playing field between early readers and other children usually evens out by the second or the third grade. That doesn't mean that reading shouldn't be taught with some rigor in the first grade. But drilling 3- and 4-year-olds on phonics and expecting 5-year-olds to be fully literate isn't the best approach. "It may squelch their natural enthusiasm for books," says Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi, a professor of psychology at Claremont Graduate University, in California. "When kids are young, it's more important that they imagine themselves as the pirates, runaways, and explorers in stories than they read every word. You want them to develop a love for reading before they try to master the mechanics."

adventure Africa autism basketball boys bullying cancer caring cause charity children compassion courage dare disability dreams empathy environment family food football games girls giving hard work homeless illness kids kindness leadership learning lessons music paralympics passion perseverance poverty quotes rescue school singing sports taking action veterans Video
Ultimately, it’s your decision as the parent. The children with a best results and the parents who feel the most rewarding experience, are those who sit down with their child and go through the program. We know that as a parent you may have other responsibilities that take up your time, so we have specifically designed Reading Head Start to be so simple, even a child with zero computer experience can use it on their own as well!
When clicking on week one, for instance, there will be five lessons in total. This is the same design throughout weeks 2-40. When completing each lesson, children complete exercises and activities. This makes the learning experience more fun — and more rewarding! The results can truly be life-changing, supporting a child’s skill set throughout their school years.
I have read to my daughter since she was about 2 months old. We have made reading a habit most nights and sometimes dad even joins us. However, she hasn’t seemed to pick up on any words so far. She is being taught to read in school, but I am worried that she isn’t learning as fast as she should. I feel like I’m doing something wrong. Is there a way I can help her?
Every child learns at his or her own pace, so always remember the single most important thing you can do is to make it enjoyable. By reading regularly, mixing things up with the activities you choose, and letting your child pick out their own books occasionally, you'll instil an early love of reading and give them the best chance at reading success in no time.

Parents have 3 mantras to remember when teaching their children how to read: 1) Start with the heart. 2) When you're out and about, sound it out and 3) Comprehension is the key that turns sounding out into reading. By keeping these in mind, parents have what they need to turn children into proficient readers who love books and will turn to them for both pleasure and knowledge.
​If you’re a parent then you probably already know that it’s absolutely essential to get a head start on kids’ reading at an early age. Not only does early reading success lead to reading success as your child continues to grow, but it serves as an accurate predictor of academic success across the board, at every level and in every subject. In short, it becomes nearly impossible for students to catch up if reading skills are not mastered early.
I’m an educational psychologist that specializes in helping kids learn the sight words through pictures, movement, and creativity. I love the ideas in this post and was tempted to add more about teaching difficult sight words, but I got worried that I would sound like I was ‘pitching’ to your readers. So, I decided to just send you a message. Love your blogs.
×