Sarah Shephard, an English teacher of 14 years, began to develop the Reading Head Start system after her own first-grade son was failing to meet average expectations in English. After realizing that the current English curriculum in schools is outdated and ineffective, Shephard set out to develop a new system that taught children to read using the principle of listening to sounds rather than seeing individual words. With the success her first-grade son and two-year-old daughter found with her new system, Shephard was determined to share it with others to help their children find the same success with reading.
I’m also a former teacher – and reading at infancy is the key! I began reading to my granddaughter when she was 2 months old. By 1 year, she knew the correct way to hold a book and turn the pages front to back. At 2 years 6 months – she began reading! She is now 2 years 11 months and reading at the 2nd grade level – I’ve tested her! She reads at least 10 books a day.
Around Lesson 8, something changed in my son. He caught on. A switch flipped in his little mind and he began putting the pieces together about slowly sounding out the letters without pausing...and noticing how he was suddenly READING A WORD! He was stunned. I was stunned. The method works, everyone. It is monotonous and repetitive, but it works. Sounding out the words without pauses between each letter is brilliant. The dot method used in this book is brilliant. He uses his fingers to move to each new dot and sound and it keeps his mind on track.
Thank you for this informative and encouraging post. As my husband and I are both avid readers, we naturally did all of these steps with our oldest child and he learned to read before he was 4 years old. We didn’t do videos or flash cards, just a natural progression and I agree it is a wonderful approach. He just finished kindergarten and reads 4th grade level books with great comprehension. It is such a joy to see him love reading, but I have to keep reminding him to put his books down while walking in parking lots!!
The strategy for learning sight words is, "See the word, say the word". Learning to identify and read sight words is essential for young children to become fluent readers. Most children will be able to learn a few sight words at the age of four (e.g. is, it, my, me, no, see, and we) and around 20 sight words by the end of their first year of school. You can teach sight words by playing with flashcards and using reading programs like Reading Eggs.
Reading Eggs was created by a highly experienced team of elementary school teachers, writers and developers to help children become fluent and proficient readers. The multi-award winning early learning resource supports your child’s learning to read journey with carefully designed online reading games and activities that are easy to follow, self-paced, and highly engaging for young learners.
Sight words, also known as high-frequency words, are the most common words in our written language are are often difficult to decode phonetically because they don’t follow the rules of phonics.  Because of this, they must be memorized.  As I’ve shared with you before, I am not an advocate of rote memorization for optimal learning because I feel it only utilizes the lowest level of cognitive processes.  However, sight words must be memorized in order for your child to become a fluent reader.  There are a few popular lists of sight words that individual researchers have found beneficial, including the Dolche List and the Fry List.  Don’t get overwhelmed when looking at this list…just start working on a few sight words at a time when you feel your child is ready.
​Sarah Shepard is an English teacher with 12 years of professional experience. But perhaps more importantly, she is the devoted mother of two sons (Landon and Mason) as well as a young daughter (Ellie). After one of her sons came home with a report card that read “ENGLISH: Does Not Meet Expectations,” ​Sarah embarked on a mission to find a better way to teach language arts to young children. Now, she is sharing the results of her incredible journey as the author of Reading Head Start.
The principal, Lucille DiTunno, decided the school needed to take another approach. First, she asked her teachers to establish a “literacy block” — 90 minutes a day dedicated to reading. Three years ago, DiTunno paid $28,000 to Literacy How, then a division of Haskins Laboratories in New Haven, to bring consultants to the school every week for a full year to teach teachers about the scientifically proven methods that help kids learn to read.
He says that parents can help kids read by taking advantage of situations where reading has some utility. “In our house, for a brief period of time, my youngest just thought it was hilarious fun when we’d ask her to clean her room but would do so by writing down on a slip of paper each task. ‘Put away all your toys.’ She would read the slip of paper, then go off and do it, and then come back for another slip of paper.” (UM, brilliant.)
The federal program Even Start is also a wonderful availability to families where children receive early childhood education while their parents participate in parenting, adult education (GED), parent and child interactive time, and PAT. Even Start is usually much more readily accessible to families than Head Start. Program information is available at famlit.org. I would encourage you to provide information on your website for Even Start as well.
​Sarah Shepard is an English teacher with 12 years of professional experience. But perhaps more importantly, she is the devoted mother of two sons (Landon and Mason) as well as a young daughter (Ellie). After one of her sons came home with a report card that read “ENGLISH: Does Not Meet Expectations,” ​Sarah embarked on a mission to find a better way to teach language arts to young children. Now, she is sharing the results of her incredible journey as the author of Reading Head Start.
Is your child halfway through first grade and still unable to read? Is your preschooler bored with coloring and ready for reading? Do you want to help your child read, but are afraid you'll do something wrong? RAs DISTARreg; is the most successful beginning reading program available to schools across the country. Research has proven that children taught by the DISTARreg; method outperform their peers who receive instruction from other programs. Now for the first time, this program has been adapted for parent and child to use at home. Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons is a complete, step-by-step program that shows parents simply and clearly how to teach their children to read. Twenty minutes a day is all you need, and within 100 teaching days your child will be reading on a solid second-grade reading level. It's a sensible, easy-to-follow, and enjoyable way to help your child gain the essential skills of reading. Everything you need is here -- no paste, no scissors, no flash cards, no complicated directions -- just you and your child learning together. One hundred lessons, fully illustrated and color-coded for clarity, give your child the basic and more advanced skills needed to become a good reader.Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons will bring you and your child closer together, while giving your child the reading skills needed now, for a better chance at tomorrow.
To put it simply, word families are words that rhyme.  Teaching children word families is a phonemic awareness activity that helps children see patterns in reading.  This is an important skill because it allows children to begin “reading” by grouping sets of letters within a word.  The first part of a word is called the onset and the last part of the word is conveniently called the rime.  Word families share a similar “rime” as the onset changes.

when they reach letter “n” they can make and read lots of words, like ” sit, sat, pin, pan, ant, is, it, nap, tap” but I told you I am new with no experience and I myself made this phonic book for them, it maybe has lots of errors, but now when I see your pages it was so fun and amazing, but the order is not the same, what should I do, would you please advise me, I have one week to start the next course so I can change my workbook please please show me the best way. God bless you lovely teacher.
In Conclusion, Reading Head Start is highly recommended! This program is a must have for your child where it actually had made this as much about parents as you have the kids. You know you child will absolutely love this system. Shape this educational reading system to be what it is today. I’m so confident you had never before had there been a reading curriculum so easy and effective. Reading Head Start is truly unlike anything out there and is getting better every single day as more content is being added such as reading games and worksheets. Even a child with zero computer experience can use it on their own as well! And your child uses this program, the better they will become at reading. If for any reason you decide not to keep this system within the next 365 days from now! Get a copy of Reading Head Start, and set your child on the path to lifelong success.

Thank you for the information and to everyone else with their questions/replies. I am a single parent who has just recently started reading heavily with my 5 year old. He is aware of the sounds and has a few of the basic words down, but struggles with reading. This really makes me frustrated, but after reading this post/comments I am glad to know that what I am forcing him to do is way ahead of his time. Pushing him to read every night and being angry when he doesn’t remember might hinder him from future learning and I definitely do not want to do that. He truly enjoys the last part of the night where we open the books together and I want that feeling to last forever. I greatly appreciate the advice and will completely back off of my son as he still has time to grow into reading whole stories. Due to a late birthday he is currently in Pre-K so I think the pressure of wanting him to do well in school, being a single parent, and my own childhood misfortunes are having a negative impact on me. I plan to regroup for tomorrow nights reading and take things a lot slower with him and make sure that he knows that he is doing a great job. Thank you so much for you have saved me from me in a way.
I’m delighted to hear that you enjoyed my article and I’m very excited to hear that you are going to teach your daughter to read; I must admit that at times it can be a challenge but it is definitely worth the effort :) If you need any more help I have quite a few more articles on my website (www.teachyourchildtoreadin30days.com) which may be of help too.
Upon getting it in the mail, I read the introduction. It picks a few sounds to teach and has kids reading very basic words with the high frequency sounds, adding sounds and words to the mix as it goes along. Brilliant! How I never thought of this on my own is beyond me. On top of that, it's scripted, which makes it so easy. It instructs you exactly what you should do if your kiddo makes a mistake, and how to praise when they get it right.
3. Language rank which in turn encouraged the woman's to do this. The girl needed the girl youngsters and also 1000s of additional young children for the greatest probable begin in lifestyle. Reading is the central skill and that's why Sarah created this kind of scientifically verified system. What Reading Head Start Is really This is an e book that may help you enhance your child's reading through capacity. The novel is actually saved in the label's official website directly into virtually any electronic digital device say for example a computer or cell phone. In your device it's going to appear in the Pdf formatting. The policies contained in the program are distinctive and can't be located in the critiques involving other programs. The training procedure can be divided in to 4 levels regarding simplicity. Being a parent you are required to allocate A quarter hour of your energy to adopt your child through the understanding stages. At the conclusion of every single cycle your child is disseminated a certificate associated with achievement that reinforces the infant's self esteem along with morale.
In other words, reading Dr. Seuss's The Cat in the Hat is an incredibly complex task that requires significant understanding beyond just being able to sound out words. It's based as much on a knowledge of how the world works as it is on how language works. So even though a toddler or a preschooler may not be ready to translate letters into phonemes into words, she is able to start gaining the contextual grounding that will allow her to give those words meaning. "From birth forward, children are becoming readers and writers," says Cox. "Their listening, drawing, early wordplay, pretend reading, storytelling, and scribbling all set the stage for reading excellence and a love of books and writing later on."
My daughter is three and a half. I have decided to home school her, because that’s what i think is best for her, and because she is already interested in learning. She picked up the alphabet almost instantly,(Alphabet song, if I remember right.) and she has already learned the sounds of every letter. (Except q and x, she knows what they are just has trouble pronouncing them.) She is improving significantly since I started (three days ago)) on sounding out 3-4 letter words. My question would have to be, where do I guide her next? I don’t want to skip something to fast and her not completely master it, or go over something so repeatedly she gets tired of it. Like you said, learning should be made fun whenever possible, which is the approach I try to use. What is your opinion?
When you read, your child hears you using many different emotions and expressive sounds, which fosters social and emotional development. Reading also invites your baby to look, point, touch, and answer questions — all of which promote social development and thinking skills. And your baby improves language skills by imitating sounds, recognizing pictures, and learning words.
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Use alphabet flash cards to connect the name of the letter to the printed shape of the letter. Once your child can sing the alphabet song, he or she knows the names of the letters. Go through the cards and tell your youngster the name of each letter and trace it with your finger. Ask your child to repeat the name of the letter and then ask her to name a few words that begin with that letter. Spread the cards on the table or floor and ask her to pick up specific letters.
Make it warm and cozy. Many parents fall into the trap of reading to their children at bedtime when they're exhausted from a long day. This often makes for an unsatisfying experience for both parent and child. It's far better for parents to choose a time when they're feeling fresh, energized, and involved in the process. Most importantly, they should make reading a warm and cozy experience: sitting under the shade of a tree, sipping hot cocoa by a warm fire, or cuddling together in bed on a lazy Sunday morning.
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The Reading Head Start program is broken up into four individual levels, each one consisting of easy learn reading videos, work books, and fun exercise and games. With just 15 minutes, three nights per week, parents can help their children as young as two years old learn to read within 30 days, even if they can’t recite the alphabet correctly yet. The system helps kids learn to begin mastering the basics and then progresses them to more advanced reading skills in a fun and exciting way.
We start off each lesson with a picture book (child's choice) then a chapter from a chapter book (my choice). Then we read the lesson. Sometimes we stop in the middle of the lesson (depending on attention span and how well the lesson is going, etc.) We always peek ahead to see if there is a "new sound" coming up. (A very exciting development, if you can imagine.) After the ...more
Create daily opportunities to build your child's reading skills by creating a print‑rich environment at home. Seeing printed words (on posters, charts, books, labels etc.) enables children to see and apply connections between sounds and letter symbols. When you're out and about, point out letters on posters, billboards and signs. In time you can model sounding out the letters to make words. Focus on the first letter in words. Ask your child “What sound is that letter?” “What other word starts with that sound?” “What word rhymes with that word?”
Visual interest still matters. If your child is shying away from or struggling to read chapter books, seek out the more visual ones, with at least one illustration on each page. Books from “The 13-Story Treehouse” series or “The Notebook of Doom” series do the trick. These books are often unjustly dismissed as too “easy” or “cartoonish,” but you should ignore that prejudice. The best of these heavily illustrated early chapter books are brilliant!
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Second and third grade. Kids in second and third grade continue to learn more phonics patterns and sight words for reading and spelling, read aloud more expressively and fluently, use reading to discover more about the world around them, and perhaps show a preference for specific authors and types of books. You'll likely start to see a shift as your child begins to focus his/her energy on learning new information from text. Ideally, children at this age have learned how to read, and are now reading to learn.
Every child learns at his or her own pace, so always remember the single most important thing you can do is to make it enjoyable. By reading regularly, mixing things up with the activities you choose, and letting your child pick out their own books occasionally, you'll instil an early love of reading and give them the best chance at reading success in no time.
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