In Conclusion, Reading Head Start is highly recommended! This program is a must have for your child where it actually had made this as much about parents as you have the kids. You know you child will absolutely love this system. Shape this educational reading system to be what it is today. I’m so confident you had never before had there been a reading curriculum so easy and effective. Reading Head Start is truly unlike anything out there and is getting better every single day as more content is being added such as reading games and worksheets. Even a child with zero computer experience can use it on their own as well! And your child uses this program, the better they will become at reading. If for any reason you decide not to keep this system within the next 365 days from now! Get a copy of Reading Head Start, and set your child on the path to lifelong success.
In nearly every conversation about reading instruction, educators talk about different pedagogical approaches and different philosophies, as if one is equal to another. And perhaps because some kids seem to learn to read like they learn to run, from observation and for the sheer love of it, it can appear like almost any kind of reading instruction can work with varying levels of success — for at least some kids. But researchers say they’ve come up with a straightforward formula that, if embedded into instruction, can ensure that 90 percent of children read.
Purchased for my son who has dyslexia. Tried the $1 trial. It didn't work. I called and they said it... was because the trial wasn't for a month but was for one log in. My options were to wait a few days and my card would be charged for the next month at the end of the week or to go online and repurchase the trial. I waited and paid the $40. For several days it was never anything interactive. Only instructions for me to purchase my own books and teach him to read myself. Tried to log in from my mothers house and was locked out. Requested a new password which came immediately to my email but will not work until I make another payment. We have decided to just get a library card and teach him on our own See More

Make reading rewarding by asking for your child’s ideas and opinions about his books. You can even help your child create a video “book talk” about a favorite book. Just turn on the camera, and ask him to say the title and author and to describe the story. Then, ask him to explain what he did and didn’t like about the book. When he doesn’t know what to say, ask him a question like, “What was your favorite part?” or “What could the characters do if the story kept going?” Grandparents, aunts, and uncles will treasure this video keepsake.
I purchased the lifetime subscription which states 1 full year money back guarantee. I submitted my request for refund just outside the payee’s (clickbank) refund period. So the request was escalated to the company for refund. I just made my third request within the last 2 weeks & no one has tried to contact me. There is no other contact, you have to rely on clickbank to get in touch with whoever can approve this. Clickbank automatically closes the request in 10 days, so I had to reopen the case...I can tell that getting my money back isn’t easy. I’m certain there are many reviews like mine which get wiped illegally. Anything to make a buck I guess.
Reading Mastery is very systematic. It starts by teaching word sounds and what the corresponding letters and words look like. Next, kids learn to read passages. Then they build vocabulary while increasing their understanding of what they read. Students are grouped by reading level. Reading Mastery is often used by general and special education teachers as a complement to other programs. It may also be used on its own. Teachers tend to use one of two versions. Reading Mastery Classic is for grades K–3 and Reading Mastery Plus is taught in grades K–6.
I’ve taught 1st grade for five years. I’ve also taught 2nd and 4th. From my experience reading is not only about word call and decoding. Your child needs to look at the print, slide their finger under what they are reading, get their mouth ready and sound it out. Work with word families and use an easy reader that has the word family in it. When you begin a story reload the vocabulary. You can use magnetic letter, dry erase markers on a table to to sound out main words in the story. For example if you have an easy reader that uses the family -op, then work and teach words that are in the story like mop, top, etc. Then when the child sees the word in print in the context of the story they should be able to recognize the family and use decoding skills to figure out the word. Don’t ever tell them the word b/c then they will get use to having someone read the words to them and they do not use the strategies taught. One last thing, your daughter is only five. Fluent reading normally doesn’t kick in til mid first grade. She just may not be developmentally ready to just pick up a book and read. Keep doing what you are doing and use the suggestions above and you will see progress. Don’t stress. Your daughter is already ahead of most of her kinder peers already.

It is good to teach your child the letters of the alphabet and their sounds. Once you have this concretized you can move on to simple word families such as ‘at’ and ‘an’. You can do games such as having your child try to add different letters before the word family to form different words such as cat, mat, sat etc. Also have your child match pictures to words. You can also use http://www.starfall.com when doing this activity as there is stories which follow after your child has learnt the words. It is also good to teach your child high frequency words. Model reading and also read with your child.

The kid stays in the picture. In great middle-grade novels, children are the protagonists; they solve problems, have adventures unmediated by adults and are generally the stars of their own shows. That’s why orphans are so common in classic children’s literature. Even in contemporary middle-grade fiction, parents seem to die or be otherwise unavailable at an improbable rate, forcing child characters to bravely confront challenges.


I taught my daughter to read using "The Reading Lesson", but I used [[ASIN:0671631985 Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons]] to teach my first child. Both books use a similar approach. I believe that "Teach Your Child to Read in 100 Easy Lessons" gives the teacher (parent) a stronger foundation in teaching reading, and I used some of the tools I had gained from experiencing that method when teaching my daughter. The strength of "The Reading Lesson" is it's child-friendly appearance and approach. "Teach Your Child to Read..." is fully scripted and has the parent's script and child's assignments jammed together. My son hated it after ... full review
Reading Head Start is not for you if you think that sitting your child in front of a screen for hours, hands off is more important than sitting beside your child, working with them for only 15 minutes per night, just 3 nights per week while other reading programs out there are just as educational as sitting your child down in front of their favorite goofy morning cartoons.
You can offer them a prize for reading a chapter, read to them before bed until they want a taste of an independent read, and tell them how great reading is. If it's an age thing (ie. your child is eight months old and henceforth, can't even speak full sentences), give them time to adapt to it. Encourage it! Children find role models in parents, teachers, elders, and basically everyone. If you can't spark an interest, appoint someone else to encourage it.
When my sons were in middle school, they loved participating in the “Battle of the Books,” a nation-wide program to promote reading. Kids formed teams and read selected books that were high quality and age-appropriate. Then they competed against other teams at their school and other schools, answering questions about the books: characters, plot, symbolism, etc. The team and competition aspect motivated my boys to read, and they had a fun time doing it. I also read a couple of the books aloud to them. Because the books were chosen by a committee of professionals, I enjoyed reading them and discussing the important ideas they covered (immigration, bullying, discrimination) with my sons.
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