Reading the Alphabet is the framework I use for teaching my boys to read — but because my older son has been recognizing words and starting to sound them out for quite some time, I move at an accelerated pace.  My three-year-old still needs some alphabet reinforcement, so I just do the simpler activities with him.    They’re both learning and growing – at just the right pace for each of them.
Scaffolding. When reading to young children, parents should keep in mind the image of a scaffold—one piece placed on top of another to make something bigger and stronger. If the bottom of the scaffold is weak and wobbly, the entire thing will collapse. Little children have limited experiences so parents should build upon what they already know. Reading a book about butterflies to a child who has never seen a butterfly is largely meaningless. However, reading a book about butterflies to a youngster who spent the afternoon watching them fluttering around her garden is immensely powerful.
“If children don’t learn at an early age to enjoy reading, it will most likely hinder their ability sometime down the road.” I do not agree with your statement. My mother worked to support her family, and I didn’t have the opportunity to read books until school. I learned to read at 5 and was very successful throughout school/college. Not every child has the opportunity to be read to, or even access to books.
Make reading rewarding by asking for your child’s ideas and opinions about his books. You can even help your child create a video “book talk” about a favorite book. Just turn on the camera, and ask him to say the title and author and to describe the story. Then, ask him to explain what he did and didn’t like about the book. When he doesn’t know what to say, ask him a question like, “What was your favorite part?” or “What could the characters do if the story kept going?” Grandparents, aunts, and uncles will treasure this video keepsake.
I bought the product back in September right before two of my children went to school. Everyday they came from school they wanted to hop on the computer to learn more because it felt like a game to them. At the same time it helped them learn to read and write. I got their report card and met with their teachers, they we're both above average in their class.
Award-winning and certified, Reading Head Start will eliminate the need for expensive tutors or developmental delays. And that in itself is worth the investment. Your child can become a leader in their classroom — and you can teach them how. Become more hands-on with your child’s willingness to learn, utilizing the guidance of Reading Head Start. The results will shock you.
Forever friends, complex plot. Remember Ramona Quimby and Henry Huggins, Nancy Drew and Encyclopedia Brown, Fern, Charlotte and Stuart Little? Chapter books are where your child meets characters who will be important friends — they will play big, ongoing roles in a reader’s life as he or she grows into a more independent, self-sufficient person. In these books, children also begin to follow longer, twistier stories, to enter into enchanting and breathtaking literary fantasy worlds with their own rules and logic, and to discover stories that will help them work through the many changes they are experiencing in their world and in themselves.

As your child becomes a more confident reader, continue to introduce a wide range of books. When it comes to reading aloud, look for two types of books — those that could be read alone and those that are above your child's current independent reading level. With this mix, your child can re-read some of these books independently, while you'll have to do the reading (or at least help) with the challenging ones that allow your child to enjoy a more sophisticated story and learn new words.


Don’t push Harry Potter too early. We love Harry Potter, but also feel there is no reason to read Harry Potter out loud to your child. If children are attracted to fantasy, they will come to love Harry so much, they’ll want to read the books on their own. In other words, Harry Potter is the dessert, not the vegetables. There are a lot of great books for kindergartners, but even the first Harry Potter book is not one of them. In fact, the sweet spot for the first four books in the series is the second through fifth grades; it’s fifth through seventh grade for the later books. There are some dark themes in the later books; the author, J.K. Rowling, wrote those understanding that her readers would grow into the later books as they worked their way through the series.
According to Shane Michaels, “The entire premise of Reading Head Start really just makes sense—like how babies learn to speak by listening, Sarah Shephard uses the same principles of teaching kids how to read by having them listen to the sounds the individual letters make, rather than them just memorizing the association between words and certain images, the method most kids learn to read by in school. But perhaps what is most impressive about this system is that it is designed in a way to get parents involved with their child’s learning process in reading, so their child gets much more of a benefit than simply learning how to read words. They get a complete learning experience that is positive, encouraging, and gratifying.”
With four levels in total, children of all ages can benefit. With 10 weeks worth of lessons in each level, your child will benefit from thousands of reading hours. Education is the key to success and by encouraging children to start reading sooner, they can develop key life skills that will promote long-term growth. She is now helping thousands of children improve their reading skills, supporting their future success.
If you're nodding along to these questions, you're the perfect candidate to teach your child to read. Sadly, too many parents have the misconception that reading must be taught by trained educators and requires a pricey phonics kit, worksheets, alphabet cards, special books, and other resources. Nothing could be further from the truth. Nobody is better suited to teach a youngster how to read than her own parents!
We know that you and your child are going to absolutely love Reading Head Start, yet if for any reason you decide not to keep the system from now, to all the way until one year from now. You can get every cent of your money back at any time. In fact, we don’t personally handle the refunds at all, making it truly trustworthy. All credit card transactions and refunds are handled by a secure third party. That means if you unfortunately decide on being refunded, you’re issued a prompt frictionless refund that same day automatically!
Hi :) First of all, that’s a bunch of useful tips you posted here Jenae! I have a lovely six-year-old daughter and I’ve been trying to start teaching her how to read for a few months now. I went through a lot of parenting forums and tried so many things, but what seems to work for her is simply playing educational games on our iPad ;) She’s got loads of them but the one she likes the most is called ‘Flincky Mouse’ and I’m even happier since we’re using Polish at home (my husband is British, but I’m from Poland) and the app comes in Polish as well. We’re also trying to read to her as much as possible and I hope she’ll appreciate it in the future! Anyway, thanks so much for the article and see you around.

LANGUAGE! is for struggling learners in grades 3–12 who score below the 40th percentile on standardized tests. It is most often used by special education teachers. The curriculum uses a six-step format for each lesson. The first step is word-sound awareness. The second step is word recognition and spelling. Then comes vocabulary and then grammar. Listening and reading comprehension come next. Writing is the last step. There is also a version of this program that is specifically designed for English language learners.

What’s my place in this big, crazy world? Children of this age are interested both in defining their own identities and in investigating questions about the larger world. A good middle-grade book can be surprisingly philosophical, taking on notions like fairness, justice, freedom and compassion. Some of the best are historical fiction set in challenging time periods like the Civil War, the Holocaust or the Civil Rights Era. They often deftly address, in an age-appropriate way, real-world problems your child is just becoming aware of: ideas like racism, refugees, the foster care system and mental illness. Tip: Whatever personal challenge your child is navigating — bullying, the end of a friendship, social anxiety, a cross-country move, or death or illness in the family — there is a good middle-grade novel that can help him or her get through it. Ask a librarian or experienced bookseller for a recommendation.
Could it just be possible that if babies learn to speak from listening to words? Can children learn to read by listening to letters? How successful your child becomes in life, all comes down to these first few years? Are you worried about your child delayed learning disability and completely skeptical? Instead of teaching your child to read the word as a whole what if we separated each letter. Here, Reading Head Start creates even more advanced theories on how to quickly teach any child to read. This system is for teaching any child to read at any age 3 more weeks passed by still only spending 15 minutes per night, only 3 nights per week using this system. This system to make the reading system available to every single parent who loves their child wanting nothing but the best head start they can give them, to being successful in both school and life.
I really take a huge advantage of it, while I can. thanks guys, I really love to teach, well I’m not a former at all, but in my native language (Spanish) I do it. I encourage my little child to learn things about life, she is 2 years old, and she knows almost how to speak Spanish very well, I play the piano for her, I read books about kids stuff to her, and so she will become a lover of knowledge just as her father does.
The Reading Head Start program is broken up into four individual levels, each one consisting of easy learn reading videos, work books, and fun exercise and games. With just 15 minutes, three nights per week, parents can help their children as young as two years old learn to read within 30 days, even if they can’t recite the alphabet correctly yet. The system helps kids learn to begin mastering the basics and then progresses them to more advanced reading skills in a fun and exciting way.
Once your child is about 2 or 3-years of age, begin asking questions before, during, and after reading the book. Show your child the cover of the book and ask him what he thinks the story is going to be about (predicting). While reading, ask him what he thinks is going to happen in the story or why he thinks a character made a particular choice (inferring). If a character is depicting a strong emotion, identify that emotion and ask your child if he has ever felt that way (connecting). At the end of the book, ask if his prediction(s) came true. Afterwards, ask him to tell you what he remembered happening in the book (summarizing).
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